indolent


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Related to indolent: Indolent lymphoma, Indolent ulcer

in·do·lent

 (ĭn′də-lənt)
adj.
1.
a. Disinclined to exert oneself; habitually lazy. See Synonyms at lazy.
b. Conducive to inactivity or laziness; lethargic: humid, indolent weather.
2.
a. Causing little or no pain: an indolent tumor.
b. Slow to heal, grow, or develop; inactive: an indolent ulcer.

[Late Latin indolēns, indolent-, painless : Latin in-, not; see in-1 + Latin dolēns, present participle of dolēre, to feel pain.]

in′do·lent·ly adv.

indolent

(ˈɪndələnt)
adj
1. disliking work or effort; lazy; idle
2. (Pathology) pathol causing little pain: an indolent tumour.
3. (Pathology) (esp of a painless ulcer) slow to heal
[C17: from Latin indolēns not feeling pain, from in-1 + dolēns, from dolēre to grieve, cause distress]
ˈindolence n
ˈindolently adv

in•do•lent

(ˈɪn dl ənt)

adj.
1. having or showing a disposition to avoid exertion; slothful.
2. inactive or relatively benign: indolent ulcer.
[1655–65; < Late Latin indolent-=in- in-3 + dolēns, present participle of dolēre to be in pain]
in′do•lence, n.
in′do•lent•ly, adv.
syn: See idle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indolent - disinclined to work or exertion; "faineant kings under whose rule the country languished"; "an indolent hanger-on"; "too lazy to wash the dishes"; "shiftless idle youth"; "slothful employees"; "the unemployed are not necessarily work-shy"
idle - not in action or at work; "an idle laborer"; "idle drifters"; "the idle rich"; "an idle mind"
2.indolent - (of tumors, e.g.) slow to heal or develop and usually painless; "an indolent ulcer"; "leprosy is an indolent infectious disease"
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
inactive - (pathology) not progressing or increasing; or progressing slowly

indolent

indolent

adjective
Resistant to exertion and activity:
Informal: do-nothing.
Idiom: bone lazy.
Translations
indolentnílhostejnýlínýnebolestivý
indolenttiitsepintainenkivutonsaamatonveltostuttava

indolent

[ˈɪndələnt] ADJindolente

indolent

[ˈɪndələnt] adjindolent(e)

indolent

adj, indolently
advträge, indolent (rare)

indolent

[ˈɪndələnt] adjindolente

in·do·lent

a. indolente, perezoso-a; inactivo-a, lento-a en desarrollarse, tal como sucede en ciertas úlceras.
References in classic literature ?
So too the poet, in representing men who are irascible or indolent, or have other defects of character, should preserve the type and yet ennoble it.
Again, the indolent reader, as well as spectator, finds great advantage from both these; for, as they are not obliged either to see the one or read the others, and both the play and the book are thus protracted, by the former they have a quarter of an hour longer allowed them to sit at dinner, and by the latter they have the advantage of beginning to read at the fourth or fifth page instead of the first, a matter by no means of trivial consequence to persons who read books with no other view than to say they have read them, a more general motive to reading than is commonly imagined; and from which not only law books, and good books, but the pages of Homer and Virgil, of Swift and Cervantes, have been often turned over.
Accustomed to ease, and unequal to the struggles incident to an infant society, the affluent emigrant was barely enabled to maintain his own rank by the weight of his personal superiority and acquirements; but, the moment that his head was laid in the grave, his indolent and comparatively uneducated offspring were compelled to yield precedency to the more active energies of a class whose exertions had been stimulated by necessity.
I had a loose box, and might have been very comfortable if he had not been too indolent to clean it out.
With thunder and heavenly fireworks must one speak to indolent and somnolent senses.
It is very curious to watch this harem and its lord in their indolent ramblings.
Young Halpin was of a dreamy, indolent and rather romantic turn, somewhat more addicted to literature than law, the profession to which he was bred.
Curse your indolent worthlessness, why don't you rob your church?
It was perhaps only poverty that had forced him to write, and now that he was comfortably provided for he became more indolent still.
He was as indolent as ever and showed no very strenuous desire to hunt up an occupation.
Sometimes I was too indolent for exercise, and accepting one of the many invitations I was continually receiving, stretched myself out on the mats of some hospitable dwelling, and occupied myself pleasantly either in watching the proceedings of those around me or taking part in them myself.
Her disposition was naturally easy and indolent, like Lady Bertram's; and a situation of similar affluence and do-nothingness would have been much more suited to her capacity than the exertions and self-denials of the one which her imprudent marriage had placed her in.