indolent


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Related to indolent: Indolent lymphoma, Indolent ulcer

in·do·lent

 (ĭn′də-lənt)
adj.
1.
a. Disinclined to exert oneself; habitually lazy. See Synonyms at lazy.
b. Conducive to inactivity or laziness; lethargic: humid, indolent weather.
2.
a. Causing little or no pain: an indolent tumor.
b. Slow to heal, grow, or develop; inactive: an indolent ulcer.

[Late Latin indolēns, indolent-, painless : Latin in-, not; see in-1 + Latin dolēns, present participle of dolēre, to feel pain.]

in′do·lent·ly adv.

indolent

(ˈɪndələnt)
adj
1. disliking work or effort; lazy; idle
2. (Pathology) pathol causing little pain: an indolent tumour.
3. (Pathology) (esp of a painless ulcer) slow to heal
[C17: from Latin indolēns not feeling pain, from in-1 + dolēns, from dolēre to grieve, cause distress]
ˈindolence n
ˈindolently adv

in•do•lent

(ˈɪn dl ənt)

adj.
1. having or showing a disposition to avoid exertion; slothful.
2. inactive or relatively benign: indolent ulcer.
[1655–65; < Late Latin indolent-=in- in-3 + dolēns, present participle of dolēre to be in pain]
in′do•lence, n.
in′do•lent•ly, adv.
syn: See idle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indolent - disinclined to work or exertion; "faineant kings under whose rule the country languished"; "an indolent hanger-on"; "too lazy to wash the dishes"; "shiftless idle youth"; "slothful employees"; "the unemployed are not necessarily work-shy"
idle - not in action or at work; "an idle laborer"; "idle drifters"; "the idle rich"; "an idle mind"
2.indolent - (of tumors, e.g.) slow to heal or develop and usually painless; "an indolent ulcer"; "leprosy is an indolent infectious disease"
pathology - the branch of medical science that studies the causes and nature and effects of diseases
inactive - (pathology) not progressing or increasing; or progressing slowly

indolent

indolent

adjective
Resistant to exertion and activity:
Informal: do-nothing.
Idiom: bone lazy.
Translations
indolentnílhostejnýlínýnebolestivý
indolenttiitsepintainenkivutonsaamatonveltostuttava

indolent

[ˈɪndələnt] ADJindolente

indolent

[ˈɪndələnt] adjindolent(e)

indolent

adj, indolently
advträge, indolent (rare)

indolent

[ˈɪndələnt] adjindolente

in·do·lent

a. indolente, perezoso-a; inactivo-a, lento-a en desarrollarse, tal como sucede en ciertas úlceras.
References in classic literature ?
Never having known mother or sisters, he was quick to feel the influences they brought about him, and their busy, lively ways made him ashamed of the indolent life he led.
My window was open, and the earthy wind blowing through made me indolent.
On emerging from the Old Manse, it was chiefly this strange, indolent, unjoyous attachment for my native town that brought me to fill a place in Uncle Sam's brick edifice, when I might as well, or better, have gone somewhere else.
Besides he all the time looked so easy and indolent himself, so loungingly managed his steering-oar, and so broadly gaped --open-mouthed at times --that the mere sight of such a yawning commander, by sheer force of contrast, acted like a charm upon the crew.
It is very curious to watch this harem and its lord in their indolent ramblings.
I had a loose box, and might have been very comfortable if he had not been too indolent to clean it out.
Indolent and childish, unsystematic and improvident, it was not to be expected that servants trained under her care should not be so likewise; and she had very justly described to Miss Ophelia the state of confusion she would find in the family, though she had not ascribed it to the proper cause.
WE strolled along in a sufficiently indolent fashion now, and talked.
He was as indolent as ever and showed no very strenuous desire to hunt up an occupation.
Churchill has pride; but his pride is nothing to his wife's: his is a quiet, indolent, gentlemanlike sort of pride that would harm nobody, and only make himself a little helpless and tiresome; but her pride is arrogance and insolence
It had therefore been with smothered displeasure that the proud though indolent Lord of Coningsburgh beheld the victor of the preceding day select Rowena as the object of that honour which it became his privilege to confer.
He was an incurably indolent person; he was not in the least afraid of Mr.