indoxyl


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

indoxyl

(ɪnˈdɒksɪl)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a yellow water-soluble crystalline compound occurring in woad as its glucoside and in urine as its ester. Formula: C8H7NO. See also indican
[C19: from indigo + hydroxyl]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The method provided possibility to identify and quantify different uremic toxins in the serum and in the spent dialysate (uric acid, hypoxanthine, indoxyl sulfate, indole-3-acetic acid, hippuric acid, etc.
For example," Hanah continued, "a recently submitted FDA-protocol to demonstrate the ability of AXOS to decrease the intestinal generation of toxins associated with kidney disease such as indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate in healthy individuals, validates our keen interest in exploring the health benefits of BFG.
For example, absorbed indole could be converted to indoxyl in the liver, and then sulfated to allow for urinary excretion.
Renal medicine, pathophysiology, nephrology, and other researchers from Europe, the US, and Japan cover the definition, classification, listing, and mass spectrometric analysis of uremic toxins; selected toxins, including indoxyl sulfate, asymmetric dimethylarginine, parathyroid hormone, and advanced glycation endproducts, and their chemical structures, metabolism, analytical methods, plasma levels, toxicity, clinical implications, and removal methods; and the therapeutic removal of toxins through hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and oral sorbents.
Alleviation of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury using phytochemical polyphenols is accompanied by reduced accumulation of indoxyl sulfate in rats.
Tyrian purple is generated from indoxyl sulfate precursors in the hypobranchial glands of Muricidae (Baker & Sutherland 1968).
This latest extension of the concept, described in an article published in Angewandte Chemie (Applied Chemistry) encapsulated two highly unstable agents--acetylcholinesterase and indoxyl acetate--as tablets in a robust assay kit for detecting pesticides in soil or water.
Enzymatic degradation of urinary indoxyl sulfate by Providencia stuartii and Klebsiella pneumoniae causes the purple urine bag syndrome.
Some HPLC peaks were identified, such as creatinine, uric acid (the highest contribution), hypoxanthine, indoxyl sulphate and hippuric acid.
It is the addition of oxygen by lengthy and vigorous beating of the fermenting liquid that converts the indoxyl into indigotin, which eventually becomes the insoluble blue pigment.