induce


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in·duce

 (ĭn-do͞os′, -dyo͞os′)
tr.v. in·duced, in·duc·ing, in·duc·es
1. To lead or move, as to a course of action, by influence or persuasion. See Synonyms at persuade.
2. To bring about or stimulate the occurrence of; cause: a drug used to induce labor.
3. To infer by inductive reasoning.
4. Physics
a. To produce (an electric current or a magnetic charge) by induction.
b. To produce (radioactivity, for example) artificially by bombardment of a substance with neutrons, gamma rays, and other particles.
5. Biochemistry To initiate or increase the production of (an enzyme or other protein) at the level of genetic transcription.
6. Genetics To cause an increase in the transcription of the RNA of (a gene).

[Middle English inducen, from Old French inducer, from Latin indūcere : in-, in; see in-2 + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

in·duc′i·ble adj.

induce

(ɪnˈdjuːs)
vb (tr)
1. (often foll by an infinitive) to persuade or use influence on
2. to cause or bring about
3. (Medicine) med to initiate or hasten (labour), as by administering a drug to stimulate uterine contractions
4. (Logic) logic obsolete to assert or establish (a general proposition, hypothesis, etc) by induction
5. (General Physics) to produce (an electromotive force or electrical current) by induction
6. (General Physics) to transmit (magnetism) by induction
[C14: from Latin indūcere to lead in, from dūcere to lead]
inˈducer n
inˈducible adj

in•duce

(ɪnˈdus, -ˈdyus)

v.t. -duced, -duc•ing.
1. to lead or move by persuasion or influence, as to some action or state of mind: Induce him to stay.
2. to bring about or cause: It induces sleep.
3. to produce (an electric current) by induction.
4. Logic. to assert or establish (a proposition about a class) on the basis of observations on a number of particular facts.
5. Genetics. to increase expression of (a gene) by inactivating a negative control system or activating a positive control system.
6. Biochem. to stimulate the synthesis of (a protein, esp. an enzyme) by increasing gene transcription.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin indūcere to lead or bring in, introduce =in- in-2 + dūcere to lead]
in•duc′i•ble, adj.
syn: See persuade.

induce


Past participle: induced
Gerund: inducing

Imperative
induce
induce
Present
I induce
you induce
he/she/it induces
we induce
you induce
they induce
Preterite
I induced
you induced
he/she/it induced
we induced
you induced
they induced
Present Continuous
I am inducing
you are inducing
he/she/it is inducing
we are inducing
you are inducing
they are inducing
Present Perfect
I have induced
you have induced
he/she/it has induced
we have induced
you have induced
they have induced
Past Continuous
I was inducing
you were inducing
he/she/it was inducing
we were inducing
you were inducing
they were inducing
Past Perfect
I had induced
you had induced
he/she/it had induced
we had induced
you had induced
they had induced
Future
I will induce
you will induce
he/she/it will induce
we will induce
you will induce
they will induce
Future Perfect
I will have induced
you will have induced
he/she/it will have induced
we will have induced
you will have induced
they will have induced
Future Continuous
I will be inducing
you will be inducing
he/she/it will be inducing
we will be inducing
you will be inducing
they will be inducing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been inducing
you have been inducing
he/she/it has been inducing
we have been inducing
you have been inducing
they have been inducing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been inducing
you will have been inducing
he/she/it will have been inducing
we will have been inducing
you will have been inducing
they will have been inducing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been inducing
you had been inducing
he/she/it had been inducing
we had been inducing
you had been inducing
they had been inducing
Conditional
I would induce
you would induce
he/she/it would induce
we would induce
you would induce
they would induce
Past Conditional
I would have induced
you would have induced
he/she/it would have induced
we would have induced
you would have induced
they would have induced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Verb1.induce - cause to arise; "induce a crisis"
bring forth, generate - bring into existence; "The new manager generated a lot of problems"; "The computer bug generated chaos in the office"; "The computer generated this image"; "The earthquake generated a tsunami"
2.induce - cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner; "The ads induced me to buy a VCR"; "My children finally got me to buy a computer"; "My wife made me buy a new sofa"
decide - cause to decide; "This new development finally decided me!"
persuade - cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm; "You can't persuade me to buy this ugly vase!"
bring - induce or persuade; "The confession of one of the accused brought the others to admit to the crime as well"
solicit - incite, move, or persuade to some act of lawlessness or insubordination; "He was accused of soliciting his colleagues to destroy the documents"
encourage - spur on; "His financial success encouraged him to look for a wife"
let - actively cause something to happen; "I let it be known that I was not interested"
lead - cause to undertake a certain action; "Her greed led her to forge the checks"
instigate, prompt, inspire - serve as the inciting cause of; "She prompted me to call my relatives"
suborn - induce to commit perjury or give false testimony; "The President tried to suborn false witnesses"
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
3.induce - cause to occur rapidly; "the infection precipitated a high fever and allergic reactions"
effect, effectuate, set up - produce; "The scientists set up a shock wave"
4.induce - reason or establish by induction
logical system, system of logic, logic - a system of reasoning
conclude, reason, reason out - decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion; "We reasoned that it was cheaper to rent than to buy a house"
5.induce - produce electric current by electrostatic or magnetic processes
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
give rise, bring about, produce - cause to happen, occur or exist; "This procedure produces a curious effect"; "The new law gave rise to many complaints"; "These chemicals produce a noxious vapor"; "the new President must bring about a change in the health care system"

induce

verb
2. persuade, encourage, influence, get, move, press, draw, convince, urge, prompt, sway, entice, coax, incite, impel, talk someone into, prevail upon, actuate I would do anything to induce them to stay.
persuade stop, prevent, discourage, deter, dissuade

induce

verb
1. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
Translations

induce

[ɪnˈdjuːs] VT
1. (= persuade) → inducir, persuadir
to induce sb to do sthinducir or persuadir a algn a hacer algo
nothing would induce me to gonada me induciría a ir, nada podría hacerme ir
what on earth induced him to do it?¿qué diablos lo indujo or lo llevó a hacerlo?
2. (= cause) [+ sleep] → producir, inducir
3. (Med) [+ birth] → inducir
I was inducedme tuvieron que provocar el parto
4. (Elec) → inducir

induce

[ɪnˈdjuːs] vt
(= cause) → provoquer
(= persuade) → persuader
to induce sb to do sth → persuader qn de faire qch
[+ birth, labour] → provoquer
to be induced [pregnant woman] → être déclenchée

induce

vt
(= persuade) to induce somebody to do somethingjdn dazu bewegen or bringen or veranlassen, etw zu tun
reaction, change, hypnosisherbeiführen; relaxationbewirken; sleepherbeiführen; illness, vomitingverursachen, führen zu; labour, birtheinleiten; this drug induces sleepdieses Mittel hat eine einschläfernde Wirkung; she had to be induceddie Geburt musste eingeleitet werden; (artificially) induced sleepkünstlicher Schlaf; a stress-/drug-induced conditionein durch Stress/Drogen ausgelöstes Leiden
(Philos) → induktiv or durch Induktion erarbeiten
(Elec) current, magnetic effectinduzieren

induce

[ɪnˈdjuːs] vt (persuade) → persuadere, convincere; (bring about, sleep) → provocare; (birth) → indurre
to induce sb to do sth → persuadere or convincere qn a fare qc

in·duce

v. inducir, provocar, suscitar, ocasionar.

induce

vt inducir, provocar; exercise-induced inducido (provocado) por el ejercicio
References in classic literature ?
He's going to try to induce me to join his expedition to the Copan valley.
There may have been--there must have been--influences, both subtle and apparent, working in their several ways to induce her to do this; but the most obvious was the influence of Adele Ratignolle.
It required no common exercise of fortitude in Uncas and the scout to continue the dignified and deliberate pace they had assumed in passing the lodge; especially as they immediately perceived that curiosity had so far mastered fear, as to induce the watchers to approach the hut, in order to witness the effect of the incantations.
In the baser sort, its effect was to increase the liability to sluggishness and dependence, and induce the victim of a shadowy hope to remit all self-effort, while awaiting the realization of his dreams.
And in the first place, you will be so good as to unsay that story about selling his head, which if true I take to be good evidence that this harpooneer is stark mad, and I've no idea of sleeping with a madman; and you, sir, you I mean, landlord, you, sir, by trying to induce me to do so knowingly, would thereby render yourself liable to a criminal prosecution.
Now that the Beef Trust had adopted the trick of raising prices to induce enormous shipments of cattle, and then dropping them again and scooping in all they needed, a stock raiser was very apt to find himself in Chicago without money enough to pay his freight bill; and so he had to go to a cheap hotel, and it was no drawback to him if there was an agitator talking in the lobby.
His conversation was in free and easy defiance of Murray's Grammar,[1] and was garnished at convenient intervals with various profane expressions, which not even the desire to be graphic in our account shall induce us to transcribe.
Secondly, such a statement would most undoubtedly induce greater vigilance on the part of slaveholders than has existed heretofore among them; which would, of course, be the means of guarding a door whereby some dear brother bond- man might escape his galling chains.
My being charming, Harriet, is not quite enough to induce me to marry; I must find other people charmingone other person at least.
Elinor was soon called to the card-table by the conclusion of the first rubber, and the confidential discourse of the two ladies was therefore at an end, to which both of them submitted without any reluctance, for nothing had been said on either side to make them dislike each other less than they had done before; and Elinor sat down to the card table with the melancholy persuasion that Edward was not only without affection for the person who was to be his wife; but that he had not even the chance of being tolerably happy in marriage, which sincere affection on HER side would have given, for self-interest alone could induce a woman to keep a man to an engagement, of which she seemed so thoroughly aware that he was weary.
And how impossible did it appear to touch the inmates of this house with concern on my behalf; to make them believe in the truth of my wants and woes--to induce them to vouchsafe a rest for my wanderings
Nothing would induce him to face his brother-officers after what had happened.