induced


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in·duce

 (ĭn-do͞os′, -dyo͞os′)
tr.v. in·duced, in·duc·ing, in·duc·es
1. To lead or move, as to a course of action, by influence or persuasion. See Synonyms at persuade.
2. To bring about or stimulate the occurrence of; cause: a drug used to induce labor.
3. To infer by inductive reasoning.
4. Physics
a. To produce (an electric current or a magnetic charge) by induction.
b. To produce (radioactivity, for example) artificially by bombardment of a substance with neutrons, gamma rays, and other particles.
5. Biochemistry To initiate or increase the production of (an enzyme or other protein) at the level of genetic transcription.
6. Genetics To cause an increase in the transcription of the RNA of (a gene).

[Middle English inducen, from Old French inducer, from Latin indūcere : in-, in; see in-2 + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

in·duc′i·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.induced - brought about or caused; not spontaneous; "a case of steroid-induced weakness"
self-generated, spontaneous - happening or arising without apparent external cause; "spontaneous laughter"; "spontaneous combustion"; "a spontaneous abortion"
Translations

induced

a. pp. de to induce, inducido-a, provocado-a.
References in classic literature ?
Wherefore necessity must be laid upon them, and they must be induced to serve from the fear of punishment.
A strong sense of the value and blessings of union induced the people, at a very early period, to institute a federal government to preserve and perpetuate it.
It is not yet forgotten that well-grounded apprehensions of imminent danger induced the people of America to form the memorable Congress of 1774.
He argued that it enticed men with the calmness of its looks, but when it had induced them to plow its waters, it grew rough and destroyed them.
My object is to explain the motive which has induced me to refuse the right hand of friendship to my cousin, John Herncastle.
There are few things upon which a greater variety of conjectures has been offered than upon the reasons that induced the ancients to distinguish this gulf, which separates Asia from Africa, by the name of the Red Sea, an appellation that has almost universally obtained in all languages.
We plied along the coast in this uncertainty two days, till on the first of March having doubled a point of land, which came out a great way into the sea, we found ourselves in the middle of a fair large bay, which many reasons induced us to think was Baylur; that we might be farther assured we sent our Abyssin on shore, who returning next morning confirmed our opinion.
Since then we propose to inquire what civil society is of all others best for those who have it in their power to live entirely as they wish, it is necessary to examine into the polity of those states which are allowed to be well governed; and if there should be any others which some persons have described, and which appear properly regulated, to note what is right and useful in them; and when we point out wherein they have failed, let not this be imputed to an affectation of wisdom, for it is because there are great defects in all those which are already 'established, that I have been induced to undertake this work.
He was an officer of the crown, and had been induced to remove from the Floridas, among the French of the adjoining province, by a rich succession of which he had become the inheritor.
We shall go willingly; (answered Sophia) our hearts have long detested thee, and nothing but our freindship for thy Daughter could have induced us to remain so long beneath thy roof.
I have more especially been induced to do this, as Mr.
He had, doubtless, by secret means, induced the owner of the horses to entrust them to his keeping and could he, a soldier, one used to trust and responsibility, forget his duty in the moment of need?