inducement


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Related to inducement: expedients

in·duce·ment

 (ĭn-do͞os′mənt, -dyo͞os′-)
n.
1. Something that helps bring about an action or a desired result; an incentive: tax breaks intended as an inducement to greater reinvestment.
2. The act or process of inducing: the inducement of sleep.
3. Law Misrepresentation that leads a person to enter into a contract or transaction with a false understanding of the risks and obligations: fraud in the inducement.

inducement

(ɪnˈdjuːsmənt)
n
1. the act of inducing
2. a means of inducing; persuasion; incentive
3. (Law) law (in pleading) the introductory part that leads up to and explains the matter in dispute

in•duce•ment

(ɪnˈdus mənt, -ˈdyus-)

n.
1. something that induces or persuades; incentive.
2. the act of inducing.
3. the state of being induced.
[1585–95]
syn: See motive.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inducement - a positive motivational influenceinducement - a positive motivational influence  
rational motive - a motive that can be defended by reasoning or logical argument
dynamic, moral force - an efficient incentive; "they hoped it would act as a spiritual dynamic on all churches"
2.inducement - act of bringing about a desired resultinducement - act of bringing about a desired result; "inducement of sleep"
causation, causing - the act of causing something to happen
corruption - inducement (as of a public official) by improper means (as bribery) to violate duty (as by commiting a felony); "he was held on charges of corruption and racketeering"

inducement

noun incentive, motive, cause, influence, reward, come-on (informal), spur, consideration, attraction, lure, bait, carrot (informal), encouragement, impulse, stimulus, incitement, clarion call They offer every inducement to encourage investment.

inducement

noun
1. Something that causes and encourages a given response:
2. Something that attracts, especially with the promise of pleasure or reward:
Translations

inducement

[ɪnˈdjuːsmənt] N
1. (= incentive) → incentivo m, aliciente m
to hold out sth to sb as an inducementofrecer algo a algn como aliciente
it's no inducement to work harderno supone ningún incentivo or aliciente para trabajar más
2. (Med) [of birth] → inducción f

inducement

[ɪnˈdjuːsmənt] n
(= incentive) → attrait m
to offer an inducement → offrir un attrait
financial inducement → incitation f financière
an inducement to do sth → un encouragement à faire qch
(pejorative) (= bribe) → pot-de-vin m
(= stimulus) an inducement to sth → une incitation à qch

inducement

n
(no pl: = persuasion) → Überredung f; (= motive, incentive)Anreiz m, → Ansporn m no pl; to offer inducementsAnreize bieten; cash/financial inducementsfinanzielle Anreize pl

inducement

[ɪnˈdjuːsmənt] n (incentive) → incentivo
References in classic literature ?
You mean that you do not understand the nature of this payment which to the best men is the great inducement to rule?
I do not often walk this way now," said Emma, as they proceeded, "but then there will be an inducement, and I shall gradually get intimately acquainted with all the hedges, gates, pools and pollards of this part of Highbury.
I will only say farther that from what passed that evening my opinion of all parties was confirmed, and every inducement heightened which could have led me before to preserve my friend from what I esteemed a most unhappy connection.
If you would furnish him with an additional inducement to forgive you, let there be an irreconcilable breach, a most deadly quarrel, between you and me--let there be a pretense of such a thing, I mean, of course--and he'll do fast enough.
And there be who say that man is not single in this, but the beasts have the like evil inducement, and--"
Harris a week or two after George had been taken away, when, as he hoped, the heat of the occasion had passed away, and tried every possible inducement to lead him to restore him to his former employment.
He found, also, a few beaver skins in their camp, for which he paid liberally, as an inducement to them to hunt for more; informing them that some of his party intended to live among the mountains, and trade with the native hunters for their peltries.
The strongest objection was that which would have formerly been an inducement to her, namely, the frequent meeting with young Jones, whom she had determined to avoid; but as the end of the hunting season now approached, she hoped, by a short absence with her aunt, to reason herself entirely out of her unfortunate passion; and had not any doubt of being able to meet him in the field the subsequent season without the least danger.
Should we for this purpose be induced to retrace our steps, we should run no small chance of encountering the natives, who in that case, if they did nothing worse to us, would be certain to convey us back to the ship for the sake of the reward in calico and trinkets, which we had no doubt our skipper would hold out to them as an inducement to our capture.
With you, it is not, How is such a one likely to be influenced, What is the inducement most likely to act upon such a person's feelings, age, situation, and probable habits of life considered -- but, How should I be influenced, What would be my inducement in acting so and so?
A fourth and still more important consideration is, that as almost every State will, on one side or other, be a frontier, and will thus find, in regard to its safety, an inducement to make some sacrifices for the sake of the general protection; so the States which lie at the greatest distance from the heart of the Union, and which, of course, may partake least of the ordinary circulation of its benefits, will be at the same time immediately contiguous to foreign nations, and will consequently stand, on particular occasions, in greatest need of its strength and resources.
He acknowledged no such inducement, and his sister ought to have given him credit for better feelings than her own.