inducement

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in·duce·ment

 (ĭn-do͞os′mənt, -dyo͞os′-)
n.
1. Something that helps bring about an action or a desired result; an incentive: tax breaks intended as an inducement to greater reinvestment.
2. The act or process of inducing: the inducement of sleep.
3. Law Misrepresentation that leads a person to enter into a contract or transaction with a false understanding of the risks and obligations: fraud in the inducement.

inducement

(ɪnˈdjuːsmənt)
n
1. the act of inducing
2. a means of inducing; persuasion; incentive
3. (Law) law (in pleading) the introductory part that leads up to and explains the matter in dispute

in•duce•ment

(ɪnˈdus mənt, -ˈdyus-)

n.
1. something that induces or persuades; incentive.
2. the act of inducing.
3. the state of being induced.
[1585–95]
syn: See motive.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inducement - a positive motivational influenceinducement - a positive motivational influence  
rational motive - a motive that can be defended by reasoning or logical argument
dynamic, moral force - an efficient incentive; "they hoped it would act as a spiritual dynamic on all churches"
2.inducement - act of bringing about a desired resultinducement - act of bringing about a desired result; "inducement of sleep"
causation, causing - the act of causing something to happen
corruption - inducement (as of a public official) by improper means (as bribery) to violate duty (as by commiting a felony); "he was held on charges of corruption and racketeering"

inducement

noun incentive, motive, cause, influence, reward, come-on (informal), spur, consideration, attraction, lure, bait, carrot (informal), encouragement, impulse, stimulus, incitement, clarion call They offer every inducement to encourage investment.

inducement

noun
1. Something that causes and encourages a given response:
2. Something that attracts, especially with the promise of pleasure or reward:
Translations

inducement

[ɪnˈdjuːsmənt] N
1. (= incentive) → incentivo m, aliciente m
to hold out sth to sb as an inducementofrecer algo a algn como aliciente
it's no inducement to work harderno supone ningún incentivo or aliciente para trabajar más
2. (Med) [of birth] → inducción f

inducement

[ɪnˈdjuːsmənt] n
(= incentive) → attrait m
to offer an inducement → offrir un attrait
financial inducement → incitation f financière
an inducement to do sth → un encouragement à faire qch
(pejorative) (= bribe) → pot-de-vin m
(= stimulus) an inducement to sth → une incitation à qch

inducement

n
(no pl: = persuasion) → Überredung f; (= motive, incentive)Anreiz m, → Ansporn m no pl; to offer inducementsAnreize bieten; cash/financial inducementsfinanzielle Anreize pl

inducement

[ɪnˈdjuːsmənt] n (incentive) → incentivo
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, Heyward began to throw sundry inducements in the way of the French general, to betray the discoveries he had made through the intercepted letter.
His was the profession at that era in which intellectual ability displayed itself far more than in political life; for -- leaving a higher motive out of the question it offered inducements powerful enough in the almost worshipping respect of the community, to win the most aspiring ambition into its service.
Some of them, however, were not inconsiderable, and numerous inducements concurred to give them an extraordinary interest in their eyes.
If with these hopes and additional inducements you, Sancho, please to return to my service, well and good; but to suppose that I am going to disturb or unhinge the ancient usage of knight-errantry, is all nonsense.
This idea will add the inducements of philanthropy to those of patriotism, to heighten the solicitude which all considerate and good men must feel for the event.
Whatever may be the arguments or inducements which have wrought this change in the sentiments and declarations of these gentlemen, it certainly would not be wise in the people at large to adopt these new political tenets without being fully convinced that they are founded in truth and sound policy.
A common passion or interest will, in almost every case, be felt by a majority of the whole; a communication and concert result from the form of government itself; and there is nothing to check the inducements to sacrifice the weaker party or an obnoxious individual.
Strange as my circumstances were, the terms of this debate are as old and commonplace as man; much the same inducements and alarms cast the die for any tempted and trembling sinner; and it fell out with me, as it falls with so vast a majority of my fellows, that I chose the better part and was found wanting in the strength to keep to it.
Although elderly ladies play cards very little, just now, in American society, or, indeed, in any other, they have their inducements for rendering the well- known office of matron at a ball, a mere sinecure.
He learned to read in the old-fashioned way out of a spelling-book at his mother's knee, and as he got on without driving by that method, she thought it unnecessary to buy him ivory letters, or to try any of the other inducements to learning now deemed indispensable.
He might have escaped this materialism through the church, but to him it offered no inducements.
Influenced by so many inducements, I determined still to persevere; though the fear of displeasing my mother, or distressing my father's feelings, prevented me from resuming the subject for several days.