induction


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Related to induction: induction heating, labor induction
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induction
When a magnet is passed through a coil of wire, it produces an electric current. The direction of the flow of the current depends on the direction in which the magnet moves. In the top diagram the current flows from right to left. In the bottom diagram the current flows from left to right.

in·duc·tion

 (ĭn-dŭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of inducting.
b. A ceremony or formal act by which a person is inducted, as into office or military service.
2. Electricity
a. The generation of electromotive force in a closed circuit by a varying magnetic flux through the circuit.
b. The charging of an isolated conducting object by momentarily grounding it while a charged body is nearby.
3. Logic
a. The process of deriving general principles from particular facts or instances.
b. A conclusion reached by this process.
4. Mathematics A two-part method of proving a theorem involving an integral parameter. First the theorem is verified for the smallest admissible value of the integer. Then it is proven that if the theorem is true for any value of the integer, it is true for the next greater value. The final proof contains the two parts.
5. The act or process of inducing or bringing about, as:
a. Medicine The inducing of labor, whereby labor is initiated artificially with drugs such as oxytocin.
b. Medicine The administration of anesthetic agents and the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for surgery.
c. Biochemistry The process of initiating or increasing the production of an enzyme, as in genetic transcription.
d. Embryology The process by which one part of an embryo causes adjacent tissues or parts to change form or shape, as by the diffusion of hormones or other chemicals.
6. Presentation of material, such as facts or evidence, in support of an argument or proposition.
7. A preface or prologue, especially to an early English play.

induction

(ɪnˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. the act of inducting or state of being inducted
2. the act of inducing
3. (Automotive Engineering) (in an internal-combustion engine) the part of the action of a piston by which mixed air and fuel are drawn from the carburettor to the cylinder
4. (Logic) logic
a. a process of reasoning, used esp in science, by which a general conclusion is drawn from a set of premises, based mainly on experience or experimental evidence. The conclusion goes beyond the information contained in the premises, and does not follow necessarily from them. Thus an inductive argument may be highly probable, yet lead from true premises to a false conclusion
b. a conclusion reached by this process of reasoning. Compare deduction4
5. (General Physics) the process by which electrical or magnetic properties are transferred, without physical contact, from one circuit or body to another. See also inductance
6. (Biology) biology the effect of one tissue, esp an embryonic tissue, on the development of an adjacent tissue
7. (Biochemistry) biochem the process by which synthesis of an enzyme is stimulated by the presence of its substrate
8. (Mathematics) maths logic
a. a method of proving a proposition that all integers have a property, by first proving that 1 has the property and then that if the integer n has it so has n + 1
b. the application of recursive rules
9.
a. a formal introduction or entry into an office or position
b. (as modifier): induction course; induction period.
10. (Military) US the formal enlistment of a civilian into military service
11. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an archaic word for preface
inˈductional adj

in•duc•tion

(ɪnˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of inducing.
2. formal installation in an office, benefice, or the like.
3. (in logic)
a. any form of reasoning in which the conclusion, though supported by the premises, does not follow from them necessarily.
b. the process of estimating the validity of observations of part of a class of facts as evidence for a proposition about the whole class.
c. a conclusion reached by this process.
Compare deduction (def. 5).
4. a presentation or bringing forward, as of facts or evidence.
5. the process by which a body having electric or magnetic properties produces magnetism, an electric charge, or an electromotive force in a neighboring body without visible contact.
6. the process or principle by which one part of an embryo influences the differentiation of another part.
7. Biochem. the synthesis of an enzyme in response to an increased concentration of its substrate in the cell.
8. Archaic. a preface.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
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induction
When a magnet moves through a conducting coil, it induces (generates) an electric current. The direction of the flow of the current depends on the direction in which the magnet moves. In the diagram on the left, the current runs from right to left. In the diagram on the right, the current runs from left to right.

in·duc·tion

(ĭn-dŭk′shən)
1.
a. The process of deriving general principles from particular facts or instances.
b. A conclusion reached by this process. See Note at deduction.
2.
a. The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by moving the conductor through a magnetic field or by moving or varying a magnetic field that already affects the conductor.
b. The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by exposing it to the electric field of an electrically charged conductor. See magnetic induction.

induction

The process of inducing a voltage in an electrical conductor by changing the magnetic field around it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.induction - a formal entry into an organization or position or officeinduction - a formal entry into an organization or position or office; "his initiation into the club"; "he was ordered to report for induction into the army"; "he gave a speech as part of his installation into the hall of fame"
inaugural, inauguration - the ceremonial induction into a position; "the new president obviously enjoyed his inauguration"
ceremonial, ceremonial occasion, ceremony, observance - a formal event performed on a special occasion; "a ceremony commemorating Pearl Harbor"
coronation, enthronement, enthronisation, enthronization, investiture - the ceremony of installing a new monarch
bar mitzvah - (Judaism) an initiation ceremony marking the 13th birthday of a Jewish boy and signifying the beginning of religious responsibility; "a bar mitzvah is an important social event"
bas mitzvah, bat mitzvah, bath mitzvah - (Judaism) an initiation ceremony marking the 12th birthday of a Jewish girl and signifying the beginning of religious responsibility
2.induction - an electrical phenomenon whereby an electromotive force (EMF) is generated in a closed circuit by a change in the flow of current
electrical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon involving electricity
mutual induction - generation of electromotive forces in each other by two adjacent circuits
self-induction - generation of an electromotive force (EMF) in a circuit by changing the current in that circuit; usually measured in henries
3.induction - reasoning from detailed facts to general principles
colligation - the connection of isolated facts by a general hypothesis
4.induction - stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors; "the elicitation of his testimony was not easy"
stimulant, stimulus, stimulation, input - any stimulating information or event; acts to arouse action
5.induction - the act of bringing about something (especially at an early time); "the induction of an anesthetic state"
first appearance, introduction, debut, entry, launching, unveiling - the act of beginning something new; "they looked forward to the debut of their new product line"
induction of labor - (obstetrics) inducing the childbirth process artificially by administering oxytocin or by puncturing the amniotic sac
hypnogenesis - the induction of sleep or hypnosis
6.induction - an act that sets in motion some course of eventsinduction - an act that sets in motion some course of events
causation, causing - the act of causing something to happen
instigation, fomentation - deliberate and intentional triggering (of trouble or discord)

induction

noun installation, institution, introduction, initiation, inauguration, investiture an induction course for new members

induction

noun
1. The act or process of formally admitting a person to membership or office:
2. Compulsory enrollment in military service:
3. A short section of preliminary remarks:
Translations
indukce
induktio

induction

[ɪnˈdʌkʃən]
A. N (Rel) → instalación f; [of new member, worker] → iniciación f (into en) (US) (Mil) → reclutamiento m, quinta f (Sp) (Med, Philos) → inducción f
B. CPD induction coil Ncarrete m de inducción
induction course Ncurso m or cursillo m introductorio

induction

[ɪnˈdʌkʃən] n
[birth] → accouchement m provoqué
(into army)incorporation finduction course induction training nstage m préparatoireinduction programme n (= induction course) → stage m préparatoire

induction

n
(of bishop, president etc)Amtseinführung f; (US Mil) → Einberufung f, → Einziehung f
(of sleep, reaction etc)Herbeiführen nt; (of labour, birth)Einleitung f
(Philos, Math, Elec) → Induktion f

induction

:
induction coil
n (Elec) → Induktionsspule f
induction course
nEinführungskurs m
induction loop
n (Elec) → Induktionsschleife f

induction

[ɪnˈdʌkʃn] n (Elec, Philosophy) → induzione f (Med) (of birth) → parto indotto

in·duc·tion

n. inducción acción o efecto provocador de una acción específica.

induction

n inducción f
References in classic literature ?
He guessed, likewise, by induction, that Porthos was taking his revenge for the defeat of Chantilly, when the procurator's wife had proved so refractory with respect to her purse.
The simplest things became the first apparent, and others followed by a species of magnetic induction, which I cannot now stop to explain.
Now if, after all, I am wrong in my induction from this ribbon, that the Frenchman was a sailor belonging to a Maltese vessel, still I can have done no harm in saying what I did in the advertisement.
You will say that I was puzzled; but, if you think so, you must have misunderstood the nature of the inductions.
Bonnycastle, who had not heard it but who, shrieking at the queer face he showed her, met it with the remark that there was now ground for a new induction as to the self- made girl.
We remained at Kadabra, the guests of Talu, until after his formal induction into office, and then, upon the great fleet which I had been so fortunate to preserve from destruction, we sailed south across the ice-barrier; but not before we had witnessed the total demolition of the grim Guardian of the North under orders of the new Jeddak of Jeddaks.
Winterbourne, who denied the existence of such a person, was quite unable to discover, and he was divided between amazement at the rapidity of her induction and amusement at the frankness of her persiflage.
She punishes abstractionists, and will only forgive an induction which is rare and casual.
The week following the induction of Tarzan into the kingship of the Waziri was occupied in escorting the Manyuema of the Arab raiders to the northern boundary of Waziri in accordance with the promise which Tarzan had made them.
Arriving, by her own process of induction, at this inevitable conclusion, she decided to try what her influence could accomplish, and to trust to the inspiration of the moment for exerting it in the right way.
M'Choakumchild reported that she had a very dense head for figures; that, once possessed with a general idea of the globe, she took the smallest conceivable interest in its exact measurements; that she was extremely slow in the acquisition of dates, unless some pitiful incident happened to be connected therewith; that she would burst into tears on being required (by the mental process) immediately to name the cost of two hundred and forty-seven muslin caps at fourteen-pence halfpenny; that she was as low down, in the school, as low could be; that after eight weeks of induction into the elements of Political Economy, she had only yesterday been set right by a prattler three feet high, for returning to the question,
Only if faced with unequivocal and forceful statements to the contrary should we abandon the belief that for Aristotle, whatever else induction is, it is different from and a complement to deduction, is a proceeding from particulars to a universal that results in a universal generalization that extends beyond the particulars that went into the generalization's formation, and obtains its force by some method other than a complete enumeration of particulars (or particular kinds).