induction

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induction
When a magnet is passed through a coil of wire, it produces an electric current. The direction of the flow of the current depends on the direction in which the magnet moves. In the top diagram the current flows from right to left. In the bottom diagram the current flows from left to right.

in·duc·tion

 (ĭn-dŭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of inducting.
b. A ceremony or formal act by which a person is inducted, as into office or military service.
2. Electricity
a. The generation of electromotive force in a closed circuit by a varying magnetic flux through the circuit.
b. The charging of an isolated conducting object by momentarily grounding it while a charged body is nearby.
3. Logic
a. The process of deriving general principles from particular facts or instances.
b. A conclusion reached by this process.
4. Mathematics A two-part method of proving a theorem involving an integral parameter. First the theorem is verified for the smallest admissible value of the integer. Then it is proven that if the theorem is true for any value of the integer, it is true for the next greater value. The final proof contains the two parts.
5. The act or process of inducing or bringing about, as:
a. Medicine The inducing of labor, whereby labor is initiated artificially with drugs such as oxytocin.
b. Medicine The administration of anesthetic agents and the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for surgery.
c. Biochemistry The process of initiating or increasing the production of an enzyme, as in genetic transcription.
d. Embryology The process by which one part of an embryo causes adjacent tissues or parts to change form or shape, as by the diffusion of hormones or other chemicals.
6. Presentation of material, such as facts or evidence, in support of an argument or proposition.
7. A preface or prologue, especially to an early English play.

induction

(ɪnˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. the act of inducting or state of being inducted
2. the act of inducing
3. (Automotive Engineering) (in an internal-combustion engine) the part of the action of a piston by which mixed air and fuel are drawn from the carburettor to the cylinder
4. (Logic) logic
a. a process of reasoning, used esp in science, by which a general conclusion is drawn from a set of premises, based mainly on experience or experimental evidence. The conclusion goes beyond the information contained in the premises, and does not follow necessarily from them. Thus an inductive argument may be highly probable, yet lead from true premises to a false conclusion
b. a conclusion reached by this process of reasoning. Compare deduction4
5. (General Physics) the process by which electrical or magnetic properties are transferred, without physical contact, from one circuit or body to another. See also inductance
6. (Biology) biology the effect of one tissue, esp an embryonic tissue, on the development of an adjacent tissue
7. (Biochemistry) biochem the process by which synthesis of an enzyme is stimulated by the presence of its substrate
8. (Mathematics) maths logic
a. a method of proving a proposition that all integers have a property, by first proving that 1 has the property and then that if the integer n has it so has n + 1
b. the application of recursive rules
9.
a. a formal introduction or entry into an office or position
b. (as modifier): induction course; induction period.
10. (Military) US the formal enlistment of a civilian into military service
11. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an archaic word for preface
inˈductional adj

in•duc•tion

(ɪnˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of inducing.
2. formal installation in an office, benefice, or the like.
3. (in logic)
a. any form of reasoning in which the conclusion, though supported by the premises, does not follow from them necessarily.
b. the process of estimating the validity of observations of part of a class of facts as evidence for a proposition about the whole class.
c. a conclusion reached by this process.
Compare deduction (def. 5).
4. a presentation or bringing forward, as of facts or evidence.
5. the process by which a body having electric or magnetic properties produces magnetism, an electric charge, or an electromotive force in a neighboring body without visible contact.
6. the process or principle by which one part of an embryo influences the differentiation of another part.
7. Biochem. the synthesis of an enzyme in response to an increased concentration of its substrate in the cell.
8. Archaic. a preface.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
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induction
When a magnet moves through a conducting coil, it induces (generates) an electric current. The direction of the flow of the current depends on the direction in which the magnet moves. In the diagram on the left, the current runs from right to left. In the diagram on the right, the current runs from left to right.

in·duc·tion

(ĭn-dŭk′shən)
1.
a. The process of deriving general principles from particular facts or instances.
b. A conclusion reached by this process. See Note at deduction.
2.
a. The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by moving the conductor through a magnetic field or by moving or varying a magnetic field that already affects the conductor.
b. The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by exposing it to the electric field of an electrically charged conductor. See magnetic induction.

induction

The process of inducing a voltage in an electrical conductor by changing the magnetic field around it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.induction - a formal entry into an organization or position or officeinduction - a formal entry into an organization or position or office; "his initiation into the club"; "he was ordered to report for induction into the army"; "he gave a speech as part of his installation into the hall of fame"
inaugural, inauguration - the ceremonial induction into a position; "the new president obviously enjoyed his inauguration"
ceremonial, ceremonial occasion, ceremony, observance - a formal event performed on a special occasion; "a ceremony commemorating Pearl Harbor"
coronation, enthronement, enthronisation, enthronization, investiture - the ceremony of installing a new monarch
bar mitzvah - (Judaism) an initiation ceremony marking the 13th birthday of a Jewish boy and signifying the beginning of religious responsibility; "a bar mitzvah is an important social event"
bas mitzvah, bat mitzvah, bath mitzvah - (Judaism) an initiation ceremony marking the 12th birthday of a Jewish girl and signifying the beginning of religious responsibility
2.induction - an electrical phenomenon whereby an electromotive force (EMF) is generated in a closed circuit by a change in the flow of current
electrical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon involving electricity
mutual induction - generation of electromotive forces in each other by two adjacent circuits
self-induction - generation of an electromotive force (EMF) in a circuit by changing the current in that circuit; usually measured in henries
3.induction - reasoning from detailed facts to general principles
colligation - the connection of isolated facts by a general hypothesis
4.induction - stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors; "the elicitation of his testimony was not easy"
stimulant, stimulus, stimulation, input - any stimulating information or event; acts to arouse action
5.induction - the act of bringing about something (especially at an early time); "the induction of an anesthetic state"
first appearance, introduction, debut, entry, launching, unveiling - the act of beginning something new; "they looked forward to the debut of their new product line"
induction of labor - (obstetrics) inducing the childbirth process artificially by administering oxytocin or by puncturing the amniotic sac
hypnogenesis - the induction of sleep or hypnosis
6.induction - an act that sets in motion some course of eventsinduction - an act that sets in motion some course of events
causation, causing - the act of causing something to happen
instigation, fomentation - deliberate and intentional triggering (of trouble or discord)

induction

noun installation, institution, introduction, initiation, inauguration, investiture an induction course for new members

induction

noun
1. The act or process of formally admitting a person to membership or office:
2. Compulsory enrollment in military service:
3. A short section of preliminary remarks:
Translations
indukce
induktio

induction

[ɪnˈdʌkʃən]
A. N (Rel) → instalación f; [of new member, worker] → iniciación f (into en) (US) (Mil) → reclutamiento m, quinta f (Sp) (Med, Philos) → inducción f
B. CPD induction coil Ncarrete m de inducción
induction course Ncurso m or cursillo m introductorio

induction

[ɪnˈdʌkʃən] n
[birth] → accouchement m provoqué
(into army)incorporation finduction course induction training nstage m préparatoireinduction programme n (= induction course) → stage m préparatoire

induction

n
(of bishop, president etc)Amtseinführung f; (US Mil) → Einberufung f, → Einziehung f
(of sleep, reaction etc)Herbeiführen nt; (of labour, birth)Einleitung f
(Philos, Math, Elec) → Induktion f

induction

:
induction coil
n (Elec) → Induktionsspule f
induction course
nEinführungskurs m
induction loop
n (Elec) → Induktionsschleife f

induction

[ɪnˈdʌkʃn] n (Elec, Philosophy) → induzione f (Med) (of birth) → parto indotto

in·duc·tion

n. inducción acción o efecto provocador de una acción específica.

induction

n inducción f
References in classic literature ?
If it was a question of a scare, my discovery on this occasion had scared me more than any other, and it was in the condition of nerves produced by it that I made my actual inductions.
As respects logical inductions, for instance, the linum usitatissimum draws as largely on the intellectual acquisitions of the various epochas that belonged to the three or four parent stems which preceded it, as on its own.
If it be in space, we shall find them setting bounds to their illimitable void, until ashamed of the feebleness of their first effort, it is renewed, again and again, only to furnish new proofs of the insufficiency of any of earth, even to bring within the compass of their imaginations truths that all their experiments, inductions, evidence and revelations compel them to admit.
You will say that I was puzzled; but, if you think so, you must have misunderstood the nature of the inductions.
Now if, after all, I am wrong in my induction from this ribbon, that the Frenchman was a sailor belonging to a Maltese vessel, still I can have done no harm in saying what I did in the advertisement.
It suggests to me that inductions themselves may not be the culprit behind the rising rate of cesarean delivery in the United States.
According to the literature, 22-24% of inductions of labour when cervical status is unfavourable end in caesarean deliveries.
The researchers said that although the rate of elective inductions has more than doubled since 1990, the practice has been poorly studied, and physicians have worried these inductions exposed women to higher risk for caesarean and the medical complications that can follow a surgical delivery.
As before, it is inconceivable that Aristotle thought these inductions were legitimate only because he, or someone he trusted, had or even could survey all the women who spoke in paternity cases, all irresponsible custodians, all wise men honored, and all the cities in the world with philosopher-rulers.
This study compared the efficacies of sevoflurane and propofol inductions for laryngeal mask airway (LMA) insertion in elderly patients.
Inductions resulted in 58% of the hospital's unplanned cesarean sections.
It was also found that over one third of inductions only lasted for one day and 26% of those surveyed felt that the ideal induction period was two weeks