indulgent


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in·dul·gent

 (ĭn-dŭl′jənt)
adj.
1. Showing, characterized by, or given to permissiveness or generosity with regard to others: an indulgent parent; an indulgent book review.
2. Showing, characterized by, or given to self-indulgence: indulgent habits.

in·dul′gent·ly adv.

indulgent

(ɪnˈdʌldʒənt)
adj
showing or characterized by indulgence
inˈdulgently adv

in•dul•gent

(ɪnˈdʌl dʒənt)

adj.
characterized by or showing indulgence; benignly permissive.
[1500–10; < Latin]
in•dul′gent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indulgent - characterized by or given to yielding to the wishes of someone ; "indulgent grandparents"
gluttonous - given to excess in consumption of especially food or drink; "over-fed women and their gluttonous husbands"; "a gluttonous debauch"; "a gluttonous appetite for food and praise and pleasure"
nonindulgent, strict - characterized by strictness, severity, or restraint
2.indulgent - tolerant or lenient; "indulgent parents risk spoiling their children"; "too soft on the children"; "they are soft on crime"
permissive - granting or inclined or able to grant permission; not strict in discipline; "direct primary legislation is largely permissive rather than prescriptive"; "permissive parents"
3.indulgent - being favorably inclined; "an indulgent attitude"
favorable, favourable - encouraging or approving or pleasing; "a favorable reply"; "he received a favorable rating"; "listened with a favorable ear"; "made a favorable impression"

indulgent

indulgent

adjective
1. Ready to do favors for another:
2. Not strict or severe:
Translations
مُتَساهِل، مُتَسامِح
shovívavý
eftergivende
eftirlátur
hoş görülümüsamahalı

indulgent

[ɪnˈdʌldʒənt] ADJindulgente
he took an indulgent attitude toward their pranksadoptó una actitud indulgente para con sus travesuras
to be indulgent to or toward or with sbconsentir a algn, ser indulgente con algn

indulgent

[ɪnˈdʌldʒənt] adj [mother, father] → indulgent(e)

indulgent

adjnachsichtig (to gegenüber); mother etc alsonachgiebig; (to one’s own desires etc) → zu nachgiebig

indulgent

[ɪnˈdʌldʒnt] adj indulgent (to or towards sb)indulgente (con or verso qn)

indulge

(inˈdaldʒ) verb
1. to allow (a person) to do or have what he wishes. You shouldn't indulge that child.
2. to follow (a wish, interest etc). He indulges his love of food by dining at expensive restaurants.
3. to allow (oneself) a luxury etc. Life would be very dull if we never indulged (ourselves).
inˈdulgence noun
inˈdulgent adjective
willing to allow people to do or have what they wish (often to too great an extent). an indulgent parent.
indulge in
to give way to (an inclination, emotion etc). She indulged in tears / in a fit of temper.
References in classic literature ?
Little Teddy bore a charmed life, for nothing ever happened to him, and Jo never felt any anxiety when he was whisked up into a tree by one lad, galloped off on the back of another, or supplied with sour russets by his indulgent papa, who labored under the Germanic delusion that babies could digest anything, from pickled cabbage to buttons, nails, and their own small shoes.
Young Aubigny's rule was a strict one, too, and under it his negroes had forgotten how to be gay, as they had been during the old master's easy-going and indulgent lifetime.
How kind has he ever been to all my follies, how tender and indulgent to all my wishes
The first time was three or four years since, when I favoured the reader -- inexcusably, and for no earthly reason that either the indulgent reader or the intrusive author could imagine -- with a description of my way of life in the deep quietude of an Old Manse.
Balt Van Tassel was an easy indulgent soul; he loved his daughter better even than his pipe, and, like a reasonable man and an excellent father, let her have her way in everything.
My face was close to his, and he let me kiss him, simply taking it with indulgent good humor.
Here, also, in summer, various brilliant annuals, such as marigolds, petunias, four-o'clocks, found an indulgent corner in which to unfold their splendors, and were the delight and pride of Aunt Chloe's heart.
There have always been many noblemen among the students, and it is presumed that all students are gentlemen; in the old times it was usual to mar the convenience of such folk as little as possible; perhaps this indulgent custom owes its origin to this.
She was an indulgent parent, however, and really had little objection to Emma Jane amusing herself in this unusual way; it was only for Rebecca, as the niece of the difficult Miranda Sawyer, that she raised scruples; but when fully persuaded that the enterprise was a charitable one, she acquiesced.
She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father; and had, in consequence of her sister's marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period.
But by an appeal to her affection for her mother, by representing the inconveniences which that indulgent mother must draw on herself, if (as would probably be the case) she consented to this increase of establishment, Marianne was shortly subdued; and she promised not to tempt her mother to such imprudent kindness by mentioning the offer, and to tell Willoughby when she saw him next, that it must be declined.
He was rather too indulgent in humouring her caprices; not from affection, but from pride: he wished earnestly to see her bring honour to the family by an alliance with the Lintons, and as long as she let him alone she might trample on us like slaves, for aught he cared