ineducable

in·ed·u·ca·ble

 (ĭn-ĕj′ə-kə-bəl)
adj.
Incapable of being educated.

in·ed′u·ca·bil′i·ty n.

ineducable

(ɪnˈɛdjʊkəbəl)
adj
incapable of being educated, esp on account of mental retardation
inˌeducaˈbility n

in•ed•u•ca•ble

(ɪnˈɛdʒ ʊ kə bəl)

adj.
incapable of being educated, esp. because of some condition, as mental retardation or emotional disturbance.
[1880–85]
in•ed`u•ca•bil′i•ty, n.
Translations

ineducable

[ɪnˈedjʊkəbl] ADJineducable

ineducable

adjbildungsunfähig
References in periodicals archive ?
From this neglect, she was diagnosed as profoundly retarded and ineducable.
Writing in Forbes in 2011, Peter Ferrara, one of the strongest advocates for Social Security privatization, argued that the proposal failed because "Bush's White House staff in charge of the Social Security reform effort never understood the politics or policy of personal accounts, and proved ineducable on the subject.
Retarded children were categorically excluded from public schools, based on the false stereotype that all were ineducable and on the purported need to protect nonretarded children from them.
Simon, who was seven years old, would rock continually and was considered ineducable.
These children were viewed as ineducable and parents were often advised to 'put their children away and get on with their lives'.
Now the reason he cannot read and write (and God knows he cannot) is not that he is part of a mass, and that the mass is by definition ineducable.
Ordination and the sacramental privileges it underpinned, preaching included, created a permanent climate of hostility toward the outsider woman who was viewed as the lustful, heretical issue of Eve, fundamentally ineducable.
It panders to the view that some kids are ineducable.
I have long since given up on golf teachers, not because I do not value their wisdom or their ability to dispense it but because I consider myself to be ineducable.
The editor never hides his own fashionable leftish views as in his reference to 'the rustic, ineducable snarl of the High Tories'.
56) Myrdal argued that women, like Negroes, were branded intellectual inferiors, deemed ineducable, confined to certain societal roles, excluded from many fields of employment, denied citizenship rights, and mythologized as "content" in their subordinate positions.
Yet it has been noted that Bourdieu has argued that the school recognises the habitus of the dominant class as legitimate, regards those who lack this cultural capital as ineducable by want of innate intelligence, and systematically excludes them by a process of neglect.