inerasable


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inerasable

or

inerasible

adj
unable to be erased
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References in periodicals archive ?
In fact these nonstop attacks have left inerasable scars on the hearts and minds of my family and may haunt us forever and this is why I strongly feel for the unfortunate Yadhev family too.
Should the BJP decisively win, the Modi idea of India will be inerasable.
Robotham, who himself had a hand in helping shape the horizon, indeed, in some sense, the left idiom, of this generation's struggles for revolutionary change, at least appreciates that disappointment is now an inerasable part of our experience of social time.
For her, war-induced trauma has been transferred from her father and grandfather's generation to her and has left an inerasable scar on her, just as what she depicts in Another World the war-induced trauma has been transferred from Geordie to his grandson Nick.
alphabet, and kin, nameless but inerasable, a singing voice that
Summary: Context is one of the persistent, stubbornly inerasable, facets of the performing arts.
Culture Minister Lubanah Mshaweh told journalists that the exhibition is aimed at commemorating those great artists," who passed away leaving inerasable impacts in our mind and souls.
But the outlawed outfit\'s Peshawar chapter later owned it up, emphatically underlining thereby the inerasable reality that the outlawed outfit is not an overarching supreme commanding body, as the ruling hierarchies apparently think of it to be.
In contradistinction to the metaphysical propensity (which strives to maintain the purity of the origin against supplementarity/ alterity) the trace of alterity is not only inerasable from the acousmatic voice but foregrounds the structural self-division and alterity-permeation inhering the voice.
Unlike a writer's style, however, the line is an inerasable trace in "the material text of the physical labour of its production" (65), the mark of "the flesh-and-blood artist putting pen to paper" (61).
The metaphor of barbed wire refers to agony, painful struggle, injury, agent of leaving inerasable marks of losses; and in Syed's own words, it refers to the nature of knowledge, its hidden and visible potential of harm.