inexplicability


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in·ex·pli·ca·ble

 (ĭn-ĕk′splĭ-kə-bəl, ĭn′ĭk-splĭk′ə-bəl)
adj.
Difficult or impossible to explain or account for.

in·ex′pli·ca·bil′i·ty, in·ex′pli·ca·ble·ness n.
in·ex′pli·ca·bly adv.
Translations

inexplicability

nUnerklärlichkeit f, → Unerklärbarkeit f
References in classic literature ?
But the inexplicability of the general's conduct dwelt much on her thoughts.
Such inexplicability undermines the justification of our moral beliefs.
Allegory is strategically absent from this passage, which is instead absorbed in an obsessive juxtaposition of events and their inexplicability.
Davidson directly interrogates this very characteristic of inexplicability thus: "metaphor doesn't say anything beyond it's literal meaning, nor does its maker say anything, in using the metaphor, beyond the literal" (41).
He took it to Ryan on the inexplicability of the Republican tax plan.
Such an attitude (not the respectful reservation of the Germans in 'The Saucer of Larks') is one that Friel really does reject because its empiricism tends to crush the intricacies and nuances and sheer inexplicability of much human emotion.
Thus unable to cope with the inexplicability of his impending death (whether it be unpredictable or augured by medical computers), Jack finds solace in the narrative symbolism of the humanly-altered natural phenomenon before him, one that is most often associated with happy endings.
That passage too, the essay argues, uses an argument from inexplicability rather than from Leibniz's definition of perception.
Bradley remarked upon the inexplicability of such a compact, distinct and historically influential mountain range apparently having no commonly recognised name, and he advocated the revival of what he anglicised as "Ellineth".
This inexplicability, it seemed, was a proposal voiced by Dyankov for an increase of 1.
Indeed, based on a philosophical tradition that associates cause with the irrational, due to the intrinsically unstable relationship of cause to effect, Jacques Lacan understood cause in terms of the inexplicability and inaccessibility of desire--and hence with the misrecognition at the heart of what we call reality: the disconnect between what we want and what actually is.
And that confusion, inexplicability, and deadliness have a tendency to rob us of the talented, inflate the mediocre, and ruin or improve the survivors--but always at least making young men who survive not forget what they have been through.