inextricable

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in·ex·tri·ca·ble

 (ĭn-ĕk′strĭ-kə-bəl, ĭn′ĭk-strĭk′ə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. So intricate or entangled as to make escape impossible: an inextricable maze; an inextricable web of deceit.
b. Difficult or impossible to disentangle or untie: an inextricable tangle of threads.
c. Too involved or complicated to solve: an inextricable problem.
2. Unavoidable; inescapable: bound together by an inextricable fate.

in·ex′tri·ca·bil′i·ty, in·ex′tri·ca·ble·ness n.
in·ex′tri·ca·bly adv.

inextricable

(ˌɪnɛksˈtrɪkəbəl)
adj
1. not able to be escaped from: an inextricable dilemma.
2. not able to be disentangled, etc: an inextricable knot.
3. extremely involved or intricate
ˌinextricaˈbility, ˌinexˈtricableness n
ˌinexˈtricably adv

in•ex•tri•ca•ble

(ɪnˈɛk strɪ kə bəl, ˌɪn ɪkˈstrɪk ə-)

adj.
1. from which one cannot extricate oneself: an inextricable maze.
2. incapable of being disentangled, undone, or loosed: an inextricable knot.
3. hopelessly intricate, involved: an inextricable plot.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin]
in•ex`tri•ca•bil′i•ty, n.
in•ex′tri•ca•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inextricable - not permitting extrication; incapable of being disentangled or untied; "an inextricable knot"; "inextricable unity"
extricable - capable of being extricated
Translations

inextricable

[ˌɪnɪksˈtrɪkəbl] ADJinextricable, inseparable

inextricable

[ˌɪnɪkˈstrɪkəbəl] adj [link] → inextricable

inextricable

adj tangleunentwirrbar; confusionunüberschaubar; link, relationshipuntrennbar

inextricable

[ˌɪnɪksˈtrɪkəbl] adjinestricabile
References in periodicals archive ?
I once heard this said about the inextricability of art and poverty, I've never forgotten the words: It is our souls that make us artists, and therefore, it is our souls that make us poor.
Memorial representations of space rekindle the retinal images, embracing man's reconciliation with nature, and what is more, his unification with it, as a supreme cradle of existence, where the inextricability of death does not impede the evolution of life, but it even stimulates it:
The local, national and global are often inextricable and to favour one over the other is to miss that inextricability, which can be seen as much through literature as though philosophy and history.
By physically recreating the spectator and dramatizing the spectator's role in meaning making, Webster both demonstrates the audience's inextricability from the play and draws attention to the reader's own voyeurism and tangible participation in the narrative.
Near the start of her introduction, Keniston provides an important gloss on her central motif: "The often impacted tropes and figures in postwar poems reveal their inextricability from the difficulties of belatedness" (5).
The significance of compensation can be understood through the inextricability of social relationships and material exchanges.
Consideration of the less tangible, structural attributes of lyric, such as its relationship to temporality, are crucial in order to understand the inextricability of the political and poetic form in Ashbery's writing.
In "After war: Manfred and the melodrama," Cox turns to a post-Waterloo moment that celebrated peace by creating the Quadruple Alliance: a paradox that, in assuming peace needs to be protected against, reinforces modernity's inextricability from perpetual war.
McDonald, drawing on the work of Jacques Ranciere and the literary academic Derek Attridge, points to the "new attempt to engage with the literary as a category, while also maintaining faith with the inextricability of literary works from historical formations" (9).
This is a theme that clearly dominates the book--the idea of the inextricability of man and language, one creating the other, the second defining the first.
Nonetheless, regardless of the critiques, the implementation of empowerment programmers and interventions became widespread as the concept of empowerment became inextricability linked to women's well-being and has been accepted as a necessary pathway to women's overall development (Grownet al.
It should be stressed that the revival of the ancient theme of self-care in our days happened in an individualistic (or rather hyper-individualistic) climate in which it risks to be misinterpreted as an irresponsible narcissistic turning point or a "form of Dandyism, late twentieth-century style" (17), losing from view that what distinguishes care of the self in a Socratic or Stoic sense is exactly its inextricability from the care for the others: in the context of ancient ethics, care of the self didn't suppose "a solitary activity", but it "was exercised in a largely communal and institutional framework", constituting "an intensified mode of social relation" and having an aim that was both ethical and political.