infamy


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in·fa·my

 (ĭn′fə-mē)
n. pl. in·fa·mies
1. Very bad reputation; notoriety: achieved infamy as the central figure in the scandal.
2. The condition of being infamous; disgrace: a name that will live in infamy.
3. An evil or criminal act that is publicly known.

[Middle English infamie, dishonor, from Old French, from Latin īnfāmia, from īnfāmis, infamous; see infamous.]

infamy

(ˈɪnfəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. the state or condition of being infamous
2. an infamous act or event
[C15: from Latin infāmis of evil repute, from in-1 + fāma fame]

in•fa•my

(ˈɪn fə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. extremely bad reputation, public reproach, or strong condemnation as the result of a shameful, criminal, or outrageous act: a time that will live in infamy.
2. infamous character or conduct.
3. an infamous act or circumstance.
4. Law. loss of rights, incurred by conviction of an infamous offense.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin infāmia; see infamous, -y3]
syn: See disgrace.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infamy - a state of extreme dishonor; "a date which will live in infamy"- F.D.Roosevelt; "the name was a by-word of scorn and opprobrium throughout the city"
dishonor, dishonour - a state of shame or disgrace; "he was resigned to a life of dishonor"
fame, renown, celebrity - the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimed
2.infamy - evil fame or public reputation
ill fame, notoriety - the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality
discredit, disrepute - the state of being held in low esteem; "your actions will bring discredit to your name"; "because of the scandal the school has fallen into disrepute"
fame - favorable public reputation

infamy

infamy

noun
1. Unfavorable, usually unsavory renown:
Translations
شناعَه، عار، فُقْدان السُّمْعَه
hanba
berygtethednedrighed
becstelenség
smán, vansæmd
kötü şöhretrezalet

infamy

[ˈɪnfəmɪ] Ninfamia f

infamy

[ˈɪnfəmi] ninfamie f

infamy

n
(= notoriousness)Verrufenheit f; (= shamefulness)Niedertracht f, → Gemeinheit f; (of deed, conduct)Niedertracht f, → Infamie f, → Schändlichkeit f (geh)
(= public disgrace)Schande f

infamy

[ˈɪnfəmɪ] ninfamia

infamous

(ˈinfəməs) adjective
1. (of something bad) well-known; notorious.
2. disgraceful.
ˈinfamy noun
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, a penalty which, in our days, would infer a degree of mocking infamy and ridicule, might then be invested with almost as stern a dignity as the punishment of death itself.
I'll keep them and notify the owners; and when they send for them it will be a real pleasure to me to hand you the two thousand dollars, for you've earned the money--yes, and you've earned the deepest and most sincerest thanks of this community besides, for lifting a wronged and innocent family out of ruin and shame, and saving a good and honorable man from a felon's death, and for exposing to infamy and the punishment of the law a cruel and odious scoundrel and his miserable creatures
There was I, then, mounted aloft; I, who had said I could not bear the shame of standing on my natural feet in the middle of the room, was now exposed to general view on a pedestal of infamy.
Where could words be found to brand her with the infamy she deserved?
Some passing thought of the infamy and disgrace for which it had been reserved, may have struck the prisoner's mind.
Approach me again, you - you - you HEEP of infamy,' gasped Mr.
This is no fair chance you put on me, proud Prince,'' said the yeoman, ``to compel me to peril myself against the best archers of Leicester And Staffordshire, under the penalty of infamy if they should overshoot me.
for I hope the reader need not be told, that I do not in the least intend my own country, in what I say upon this occasion,) a great number of persons concerned were called up; and, upon a very slight examination, discovered such a scene of infamy, that I cannot reflect upon it without some seriousness.
His meeting with Adrian Singleton had strangely moved him, and he wondered if the ruin of that young life was really to be laid at his door, as Basil Hallward had said to him with such infamy of insult.
replied Camilla, "we shall leave him for Anselmo to bury him; for in reason it will be to him a light labour to hide his own infamy under ground.
Regard to reputation has a less active influence, when the infamy of a bad action is to be divided among a number than when it is to fall singly upon one.
Into the details of the infamy at which I thus connived (for even now I can scarce grant that I committed it) I have no design of entering; I mean but to point out the warnings and the successive steps with which my chastisement approached.