infanticidal


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in·fan·ti·cide

 (ĭn-făn′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
1. The act of killing an infant.
2. The practice of killing newborn infants.
3. One who kills an infant.

[Late Latin īnfanticīdium, the killing of a child and īnfanticīda, killer of a child : Latin īnfāns, īnfant-, infant; see infant + Latin -cīdium and -cīda, -cide.]

in·fan′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Macbeth's infanticidal fantasy wreaks upon the social and political
The British have had an infanticide statute since 1922 under which postpartum disturbance is at least a partial defense to a charge of infanticidal murder, reducing the charge from murder to manslaughter.
Unlike Kilday, Durston does not systematically examine the methods that infanticidal women used, but he provides a concise legal history of the offence, the only form of fatal violence in which women predominated.
Simply describing partial-birth abortion is enough to revolt a majority of Americans, who have asked time and again for the barbaric, infanticidal practice to end.
Whereas Wordsworth contributes to the mythology of the distracted infanticidal mother, oppressed by patriarchy but embraced by Nature, Malthus' Dame Nature is a rational killer, decreasing the surplus population.
Still, our attributions for battered women go straight to the psyche, to that likely mix of mental, emotional, and motivational elements that we must somehow sort for culpability determinations, whereas something is different for the infanticidal women of England, for their psychic flotsam, it is claimed, results from a deeper bodily disturbance.
Females also assist mothers, sisters, and daughters--but not more-distant relatives or strangers--with the defense of their burrows against infanticidal intruders.
24) The modal age of the infanticidal mothers in my original work was twenty-one.
In Weisenburger's words, "when the infanticidal mother acts out the system's violent logic in the master's face,.
Although infanticide trials commonly ended in a conviction for the lesser crime of concealment of a birth or a straight acquittal, some infanticidal mothers were acquitted on ground of insanity.
In her examination of child murder, she makes much use of Shakespeare's Winter's Tale (a case of abandonment with infanticidal intentions), in which Leontes' suspicions of his wife are based on a combination of all the usual threats to order: the witch, the traitor, the adulterous, disobedient wife.
Concerns about a range of feelings in mothers, from the infanticidal to the eroticism of breastfeeding, threatened the sentimental ideal.