infarct

(redirected from infarcts)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

in·farct

 (ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

[From Latin īnfarctus, past participle of īnfarcīre, to cram : in-, in; see in-2 + farcīre, to stuff.]

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

(ɪnˈfɑːkt)
n
(Pathology) a localized area of dead tissue (necrosis) resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to that part, esp by an embolus. Also called: infarction
[C19: via New Latin from Latin infarctus stuffed into, from farcīre to stuff]
inˈfarcted adj

in•farct

(ˈɪnˌfɑrkt, ɪnˈfɑrkt)

n.
an area of tissue, as in the heart or kidney, that is dying or dead, having been deprived of its blood supply.
[1870–75; < New Latin infarctus, n. use of past participle of Latin infarcīre (variant of infercīre) to stuff (compare farce)]
in•farct′ed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infarct - localized necrosis resulting from obstruction of the blood supply
MI, myocardial infarct, myocardial infarction - destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

infarct

n (Med) → Infarkt m

in·farct

n. infarto, necrosis de un área de tejido por falta de irrigación sanguínea (isquemia);
bland ______ blando;
cardiac ______ cardíaco;
cerebral ______ cerebral;
hermorrhagic ______ hemorrágico;
myocardial ______ del miocardio;
pulmonary ______ pulmonar.

infarct

n infarto
References in periodicals archive ?
The study authors write: "Purpose in life may affect risk for cerebral infarcts, specifically macroscopic lacunar infarcts.
Writing in the May 2015 issue of Stroke, researchers who studied more than 900 participants of the Framingham Heart Study found evidence of smaller brain structure and of covert brain infarcts, a type of "silent" ischemic stroke resulting from a blockage in the blood vessels supplying the brain.
compared 68 ischemic stroke patients to 51 controls and found that the serum S100B levels of the patients were higher than that of the controls due to the size of infarction in TACI and lower in lacunar infarcts.
In the Cardiovascular Health Study in the USA, 3,660 people aged 65 and older underwent brain scans to detect so called silent brain infarcts, or small lesions in the brain that can cause loss of thinking skills, dementia and stroke.
It is possible that many cases of splenic infarcts in malaria are missed because ultrasound and CT of the abdomen are not routinely done in patients of malaria.
The most widely accepted classification of ischemic stroke is based on TOAST criteria which divides ischemic stroke into five categories, namely--large artery atherosclerosis, cardioembolism, small vessel occlusion (lacunar infarction), undetermined etiology and multiple possible etiologies [5,6] Another method of classification is modified Oxfordshire method, based on the anatomic distribution of infarcts-- total anterior circulation infarcts, partial anterior circulation infarcts, posterior circulation infarcts, watershed infarcts, centrum ovale infarcts and lacunar infarcts.
Macroscopic infarcts were found in 150 (36%) of the 418 brains that were autopsied for the study, and 110 of those also had evidence of pathologies that can't be detected by conventional imaging, including microinfarcts, arteriolosclerosis, or both.
Patient infarcts were classified by volume into small infarct (<5mL,n= 59) and moderate to large infarct ([greater than or equal to] 5mL, n = 30) (26).
These findings from a prospective longitudinal study are consistent with those of the recent cross-sectional CAMERA (Cerebral Abnormalities in Migraine, an Epidemiological Risk Analysis) study (JAMA 2004;291:427-34), "the only other study that measured infarcts on MRI, which also found the migraine-associated infarcts to be preferentially located in the cerebellum," they noted.
As such, they confirm the previous findings and point to the need for additional research with sequential MRIs "to better establish the temporality and dose-response relationship between migraine with aura and brain infarcts," they added.
Right ventricular hypertrophy is reported to develop only in rodents with large infarcts.