inference

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in·fer·ence

 (ĭn′fər-əns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be true.
b. The act of reasoning from factual knowledge or evidence.
2.
a. Something inferred.
b. Usage Problem A hint or suggestion: The editorial contained an inference of foul play in the awarding of the contract. See Usage Note at infer.

inference

(ˈɪnfərəns; -frəns)
n
1. the act or process of inferring
2. an inferred conclusion, deduction, etc
3. (Logic) any process of reasoning from premises to a conclusion
4. (Logic) logic the specific mode of reasoning used. See also deduction4, induction4

in•fer•ence

(ˈɪn fər əns, -frəns)

n.
1. the act or process of inferring.
2. something that is inferred.
3. Logic.
a. the process of deriving from assumed premises either the strict logical conclusion or one that is to some degree probable.
b. a proposition reached by a process of inference.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
analogy - an inference that if things agree in some respects they probably agree in others
corollary - (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
derivation - a line of reasoning that shows how a conclusion follows logically from accepted propositions
entailment, implication, deduction - something that is inferred (deduced or entailed or implied); "his resignation had political implications"
extrapolation - an inference about the future (or about some hypothetical situation) based on known facts and observations
presumption - (law) an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved or admitted or judicially noticed

inference

noun deduction, conclusion, assumption, reading, consequence, presumption, conjecture, surmise, corollary There were two inferences to be drawn from her letter.

inference

noun
A position arrived at by reasoning from premises or general principles:
Translations
إسْتِدْلال، إسْتِنْتاج
dedukcezávěr
følgeslutningslutning
ályktun
sonuç/anlam

inference

[ˈɪnfərəns] Ndeducción f, inferencia f
by inferencepor deducción
to draw inferencessacar conclusiones
to draw an inference from sthhacer una deducción de algo

inference

[ˈɪnfərəns] n
(= deduction) → conclusion f
to draw an inference from sth → tirer une conclusion de qch
the inference is that ... → on doit en conclure que ...
by inference → par déduction

inference

nSchluss (→ folgerung f) m; it has a tiny head and, by inference, a tiny braines hat einen winzigen Kopf und demzufolge ein winziges Gehirn; he said, by inference, that …implizit sagte er, dass …

inference

[ˈɪnfrns] ndeduzione f, illazione f

infer

(inˈfəː) past tense, past participle inˈferred verb
to judge (from facts or evidence). I inferred from your silence that you were angry.
ˈinference noun
References in classic literature ?
If we will arbitrarily suppose the contrary, we may deduce any inferences we please from the supposition; for it is certainly possible, by an injudicious exercise of the authorities of the best government that ever was, or ever can be instituted, to provoke and precipitate the people into the wildest excesses.
What seems strange to you is only so because you do not follow my train of thought or observe the small facts upon which large inferences may depend.
The more such inferences are examined, the more precarious they are seen to be.
does stand for 'Charing Cross Hospital,' what further inferences may we draw?
I propose to tell you--in the first place--what is known of the manner in which your cousin met his death; appending to the statement such inferences and conclusions as we are justified (according to my opinion) in drawing from the facts.
There are a few of the serious inferences which we are led by the hand to in this book, and these are fully sufficient to justify any man in recommending it to the world, and much more to justify the publication of it.
I can only put you confidentially in possession of my private opinion, leaving you entirely free to draw your own inferences from it, and regretting that I cannot write more confidently and more definitely than I have written here.
Those who think that a man betrays his character nowhere more clearly than when he is playing a game might on this draw subtle inferences.
I could now see that I had been trebly in the wrong--wrong in hastily and cruelly suspecting an innocent woman; wrong in communicating my suspicions (without an attempt to verify them previously) to another person; wrong in accepting the flighty inferences and conclusions of Miserrimus Dexter as if they had been solid truths.
Again, there is a composite kind of recognition involving false inference on the part of one of the characters, as in the Odysseus Disguised as a Messenger.
Karnegie's lawyer, the inference appeared to be, that "Mrs.
No fragments which can be identified as belonging to the first period survive to give us even a general idea of the history of the earliest epic, and we are therefore thrown back upon the evidence of analogy from other forms of literature and of inference from the two great epics which have come down to us.