inference

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in·fer·ence

 (ĭn′fər-əns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be true.
b. The act of reasoning from factual knowledge or evidence.
2.
a. Something inferred.
b. Usage Problem A hint or suggestion: The editorial contained an inference of foul play in the awarding of the contract. See Usage Note at infer.

inference

(ˈɪnfərəns; -frəns)
n
1. the act or process of inferring
2. an inferred conclusion, deduction, etc
3. (Logic) any process of reasoning from premises to a conclusion
4. (Logic) logic the specific mode of reasoning used. See also deduction4, induction4

in•fer•ence

(ˈɪn fər əns, -frəns)

n.
1. the act or process of inferring.
2. something that is inferred.
3. Logic.
a. the process of deriving from assumed premises either the strict logical conclusion or one that is to some degree probable.
b. a proposition reached by a process of inference.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
analogy - an inference that if things agree in some respects they probably agree in others
corollary - (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
derivation - a line of reasoning that shows how a conclusion follows logically from accepted propositions
entailment, implication, deduction - something that is inferred (deduced or entailed or implied); "his resignation had political implications"
extrapolation - an inference about the future (or about some hypothetical situation) based on known facts and observations
presumption - (law) an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved or admitted or judicially noticed

inference

noun deduction, conclusion, assumption, reading, consequence, presumption, conjecture, surmise, corollary There were two inferences to be drawn from her letter.

inference

noun
A position arrived at by reasoning from premises or general principles:
Translations
إسْتِدْلال، إسْتِنْتاج
dedukcezávěr
følgeslutningslutning
ályktun
sonuç/anlam

inference

[ˈɪnfərəns] Ndeducción f, inferencia f
by inferencepor deducción
to draw inferencessacar conclusiones
to draw an inference from sthhacer una deducción de algo

inference

[ˈɪnfərəns] n
(= deduction) → conclusion f
to draw an inference from sth → tirer une conclusion de qch
the inference is that ... → on doit en conclure que ...
by inference → par déduction

inference

nSchluss (→ folgerung f) m; it has a tiny head and, by inference, a tiny braines hat einen winzigen Kopf und demzufolge ein winziges Gehirn; he said, by inference, that …implizit sagte er, dass …

inference

[ˈɪnfrns] ndeduzione f, illazione f

infer

(inˈfəː) past tense, past participle inˈferred verb
to judge (from facts or evidence). I inferred from your silence that you were angry.
ˈinference noun
References in classic literature ?
No more, Queequeg, said I, shuddering; that will do; for I knew the inferences without his further hinting them.
Luigi was incensed, and asked how it could be that the old gentleman, who was by no means dull-witted, held his trifling nephew's evidence in inferences to be of more value than Wilson's.
No well-regulated mind ever draws its inferences in a hurry; Miss Garth's mind was well regulated; therefore, logically speaking, Miss Garth ought to have been superior to the weakness of rushing at conclusions.
What thou sayest is true, Sancho," replied Don Quixote; "but I have already told thee there are many sorts of enchantments, and it may be that in the course of time they have been changed one for another, and that now it may be the way with enchanted people to do all that I do, though they did not do so before; so it is vain to argue or draw inferences against the usage of the time.
In the same way I thought that the sciences contained in books (such of them at least as are made up of probable reasonings, without demonstrations), composed as they are of the opinions of many different individuals massed together, are farther removed from truth than the simple inferences which a man of good sense using his natural and unprejudiced judgment draws respecting the matters of his experience.
These are not vague inferences drawn from supposed or speculative defects in a Constitution, the whole power of which is lodged in the hands of a people, or their representatives and delegates, but they are solid conclusions, drawn from the natural and necessary progress of human affairs.
Two inferences, however, were plainly deduced from the whole: one, that Elizabeth was the real cause of the mischief; and the other that she herself had been barbarously misused by them all; and on these two points she principally dwelt during the rest of the day.
Nay, nay," said Adam, broadening his chest and throwing himself back in his chair, as if he were ready to meet all inferences, "nobody has ever heard me say Mr.
He makes, in silence, a host of observations and inferences.
With her arm locked in that of Miss Grant, the young mistress of the mansion walked slowly up and down the hall, musing on scenes that were rapidly recurring to her memory, and possibly dwelling, at times, in the sanctuary of her thoughts, on the strange occurrences that had led to the introduction to her father’s family of one whose Manners so singularly contradicted the inferences to be drawn from his situation.
And she explained to me that one of them - the long one on the top of the pile, on the table over there - seemed to contain ugly inferences directed at herself in a menacing way.
The furthest records or surmises or inferences simply accept it as existing.