inferno

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in·fer·no

 (ĭn-fûr′nō)
n. pl. in·fer·nos
1. A place or condition suggestive of hell, especially with respect to human suffering or death: the inferno of battle.
2. A place of fiery heat or destruction.

[Italian, hell, from Late Latin īnfernus; see infernal.]

inferno

(ɪnˈfɜːnəʊ)
n, pl -nos
1. (Theology) the inferno (sometimes capital) hell; the infernal region
2. any place or state resembling hell, esp a conflagration
[C19: from Italian, from Late Latin infernus hell]

in•fer•no

(ɪnˈfɜr noʊ)

n., pl. -nos.
1. hell; the infernal regions.
2. a place or region that resembles hell, esp. in intense heat.
[1825–35; < Italian < Late Latin infernus hell, n. use of Latin infernus; see infernal]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inferno - any place of pain and turmoilinferno - any place of pain and turmoil; "the hell of battle"; "the inferno of the engine room"; "when you're alone Christmas is the pits";
region, part - the extended spatial location of something; "the farming regions of France"; "religions in all parts of the world"; "regions of outer space"
2.inferno - a very intense and uncontrolled fireinferno - a very intense and uncontrolled fire
fire - the event of something burning (often destructive); "they lost everything in the fire"
wildfire - a raging and rapidly spreading conflagration
3.inferno - (Christianity) the abode of Satan and the forces of evilInferno - (Christianity) the abode of Satan and the forces of evil; where sinners suffer eternal punishment; "Hurl'd headlong...To bottomless perdition, there to dwell"- John Milton; "a demon from the depths of the pit"; "Hell is paved with good intentions"-Dr. Johnson
fictitious place, imaginary place, mythical place - a place that exists only in imagination; a place said to exist in fictional or religious writings
Gehenna, Tartarus - a place where the wicked are punished after death
hellfire, red region - a place of eternal fire envisaged as punishment for the damned
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior

inferno

noun blaze, fire, flames, conflagration Rescue workers fought to get to victims inside the inferno.
Translations

inferno

[ɪnˈfɜːnəʊ] N (= hell) → infierno m; (= fire) → hoguera f
in a few minutes the house was a blazing infernoen pocos minutos la casa era una hoguera
it's like an inferno in thereallí dentro hace un calor insoportable

inferno

[ɪnˈfɜːrnəʊ] n (= fiercely burning fire) → brasier m

inferno

n (= hell)Hölle f, → Inferno nt; (= blazing house etc)Flammenmeer nt; a blazing infernoein flammendes Inferno; it’s like an inferno in here (fig)hier ist es wie in einem Brutofen

inferno

[ɪnˈfɜːnəʊ] ninferno
References in classic literature ?
When Jurgis had first inspected the packing plants with Szedvilas, he had marveled while he listened to the tale of all the things that were made out of the carcasses of animals, and of all the lesser industries that were maintained there; now he found that each one of these lesser industries was a separate little inferno, in its way as horrible as the killing beds, the source and fountain of them all.
He clung to one idea -- that of his happiness, destroyed, without apparent cause, by an unheard-of fatality; he considered and reconsidered this idea, devoured it (so to speak), as the implacable Ugolino devours the skull of Archbishop Roger in the Inferno of Dante.
Twice he was heaved, kicked, and shouldered back again into the unpaintable inferno of a hotly contested charge.
The young stranger, who was not unstudied in the great poem of his country, recollected that one of the ancestors of this family, and perhaps an occupant of this very mansion, had been pictured by Dante as a partaker of the immortal agonies of his Inferno.
She heard him at last, and, as if overcome by fate, began to totter silently back toward her stuffy little inferno of a cottage.
Nobody but a professional fasting man could have looked unmoved into the Inferno she had pictured.
As they lay sprawled about the floor, sometimes overlapping one another, again in heaps of several bodies, they suggested instantly to me the grotesque illustrations that I had seen in copies of Dante's INFERNO, and what more fitting comparison?
Well, Bunny, if they don't want you there, there's a little Inferno in the Albany where you will be as welcome as ever
And also, if Dante had wished for a new type to be added to his characters of the Inferno, he might have chosen Boxtel during the period of Van Baerle's successes.
And, gazing down on the smoky inferno of crude effort, Daylight outlined the new game he would play, a game in which the Guggenhammers and the rest would have to reckon with him.