infidel

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in·fi·del

 (ĭn′fĭ-dəl, -dĕl′)
n.
1. Often Offensive An unbeliever with respect to a particular religion, especially Christianity or Islam.
2. One who has no religious beliefs.
3. One who doubts or rejects a particular doctrine, system, or principle.

[Middle English infidele, from Old French, from Latin īnfidēlis, disloyal : in-, not; see in-1 + fidēlis, faithful (from fidēs, faith; see bheidh- in Indo-European roots).]

infidel

(ˈɪnfɪdəl)
n
a person who has no religious belief; unbeliever
adj
1. rejecting a specific religion, esp Christianity or Islam
2. of, characteristic of, or relating to unbelievers or unbelief
[C15: from Medieval Latin infidēlis, from Latin (adj): unfaithful, from in-1 + fidēlis faithful; see feal]

in•fi•del

(ˈɪn fɪ dl, -ˌdɛl)

n.
1.
a. a person who does not accept a particular religion, esp. Christianity.
b. (in Muslim use) a person who does not accept the Islamic faith; kaffir.
2. a person who has no religious faith; an unbeliever.
3. a person who disbelieves a particular theory, belief, etc.
adj.
4. of or concerning infidels; heathen.
5. without religious faith.
6. Also, in`fi•del′ic (-ˈdɛl ɪk) of, pertaining to, or characteristic of unbelievers or infidels.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin infidēlis unbelieving, Latin: unfaithful, treacherous]
syn: See atheist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infidel - a person who does not acknowledge your godinfidel - a person who does not acknowledge your god
nonreligious person - a person who does not manifest devotion to a deity
paynim - a heathen; a person who is not a Christian (especially a Muslim)
idol worshiper, idolater, idoliser, idolizer - a person who worships idols

infidel

noun unbeliever, sceptic, atheist, heretic, agnostic, heathen, nonconformist, freethinker, nonbeliever a holy war to drive the infidels out
Translations
nevěřící

infidel

[ˈɪnfɪdəl]
A. ADJinfiel, descreído
B. Ninfiel mf, descreído/a m/f
the Infidellos descreídos, la gente descreída

infidel

[ˈɪnfɪdəl]
ninfidèle mf
adjinfidèle

infidel

n (Hist, Rel) → Ungläubige(r) mf

infidel

[ˈɪnfɪdəl] (liter)
1. ninfedele m/f
2. adjmiscredente
References in classic literature ?
I invite you, friends, to join in praise for this signal deliverance from the hands of barbarians and infidels, to the comfortable and solemn tones of the tune called ' Northampton'.
For every walk is a sort of crusade, preached by some Peter the Hermit in us, to go forth and reconquer this Holy Land from the hands of the Infidels.
We might start at five o'clock and be in time, but the delay may cause your friend to pass an uneasy night, and therefore we had better go with all speed to extricate him from the hands of the infidels.
The Emperor of Constantinople,[*] to oppose his neighbours, sent ten thousand Turks into Greece, who, on the war being finished, were not willing to quit; this was the beginning of the servitude of Greece to the infidels.
Still further, the conqueror laughs, and we Frenchmen ought not to allow stupid infidels to triumph over our faults.
The infidels have profaned the holiest of the holies.
Many infidels deny this creature's existence, but Semprello Aurator
I have heard the minstrels sing of one Sir Roland who was slain by the infidels in these very parts.
Ah, yes, these modern infidels appeal to their reason; but who can look at those millions of worlds and not feel that there may well be wonderful universes above us where reason is utterly unreasonable?
He said, he doubted not but that all the infidels and hereticks in the world would, if they could, confine honour to their own absurd errors and damnable deceptions; "but honour," says he, "is not therefore manifold, because there are many absurd opinions about it; nor is religion manifold, because there are various sects and heresies in the world.
As he bowed over her he smiled, and quoted the hackneyed and beautiful lines from The Rape of the Lock about Belinda's diamonds, "which Jews might kiss and infidels adore.
He tried to make us act plays and to enter into masquerades, in which the characters were drawn from the heroes of Roncesvalles, of the Round Table of King Arthur, and the chivalrous train who shed their blood to redeem the holy sepulchre from the hands of the infidels.