infinitesimal

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in·fin·i·tes·i·mal

 (ĭn′fĭn-ĭ-tĕs′ə-məl)
adj.
1. Immeasurably or incalculably minute.
2. Mathematics Capable of having values approaching zero as a limit.
n.
1. An immeasurably or incalculably minute amount or quantity.
2. Mathematics A function or variable continuously approaching zero as a limit.

[From New Latin īnfīnītēsimus, infinite in rank, from Latin īnfīnītus, infinite; see infinite.]

in′fin·i·tes′i·mal·ly adv.

infinitesimal

(ˌɪnfɪnɪˈtɛsɪməl)
adj
1. infinitely or immeasurably small
2. (Mathematics) maths of, relating to, or involving a small change in the value of a variable that approaches zero as a limit
n
(Mathematics) maths an infinitesimal quantity
ˌinfiniˈtesimally adv

in•fin•i•tes•i•mal

(ˌɪn fɪn ɪˈtɛs ə məl)

adj.
1. indefinitely or exceedingly small; minute.
2. immeasurably small; less than an assignable quantity: to an infinitesimal degree.
3. of, pertaining to, or involving infinitesimals.
n.
4. an infinitesimal quantity.
5. Math. a variable having zero as a limit.
[1645–55; < New Latin infīnītēsim(us) (Latin infīnīt(us) infinite + -ēsimus suffix of ordinal numerals) + -al1]
in`fin•i•tes`i•mal′i•ty, in`fin•i•tes′i•mal•ness, n.
in`fin•i•tes′i•mal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infinitesimal - (mathematics) a variable that has zero as its limit
variable quantity, variable - a quantity that can assume any of a set of values
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
Adj.1.infinitesimal - infinitely or immeasurably smallinfinitesimal - infinitely or immeasurably small; "two minute whiplike threads of protoplasm"; "reduced to a microscopic scale"
little, small - limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group"

infinitesimal

adjective microscopic, minute, tiny, wee, atomic, insignificant, negligible, minuscule, teeny, teeny-weeny, unnoticeable, teensy-weensy, inappreciable mineral substances present in infinitesimal amounts in the soil
great, large, huge, vast, enormous, infinite

infinitesimal

adjective
So minute as not to be discernible:
Translations
nepatrný
inifinitesimal
infinitesimal

infinitesimal

[ˌɪnfɪnɪˈtesɪməl] ADJinfinitesimal

infinitesimal

[ˌɪnfɪnɪˈtɛsɪməl] adjinfinitésimal(e)

infinitesimal

infinitesimal

[ˌɪnf/ɛ7nɪˈtɛsɪml] adjinfinitesimale
References in classic literature ?
We cannot observe infinitesimals, whether in time or space; we do not even know whether time and space are infinitely divisible.
Among the topics are the remarkable career of Otto Grun, Emmy Noether and Hermann Weyl, Abraham Robinson and his infinitesimals, Cahit Arf and his invariant, Heinrich-Wolfgang Leopoldt, and Hoechsmann's theorem.
He is a good teacher but has been an imperfect man; however, he and Brianna forge a bond in their shared mortality and find comfort in a mathematical concept holding that without infinite infinitesimals life would not be possible as we know it.
Jullien holds that Roberval's conception (which he shares with Pascal according to Dominique Descotes) is an important stage between the lines of Cavalieri and the infinitesimals, the dx, of Leibniz.
Three chapters take up the innovations that from the 1640s onward led to the new infinitesimal calculus of Newton and Leibniz.
Rather, this narrative was robust enough that mathematicians were able to use it to explain their own search for truth, Its story of hardship and discovery helped them explore the inner workings of mathematical reality, leading to the development of the method of infinitesimals, a precursor to the calculus.
Also, if, as Alexander contends, all mathematicians are influenced by this narrative and used it to describe their work, how is it that not all of them are interested in infinitesimals, and in fact some are actively opposed?
29) This debate focuses on the status of infinitesimals, but the debate itself is delimited by the impossibility of a maximal or minimal quantity.
Leibniz goes on to confess that this does not rule out, however, the possibility of infinitesimals and infinitely large things, "since a maximum is different from the infinite and a minimum from the infinitely small.
17) For the purposes of devising a theory of motion, this concept of infinitesimal is extended such that each positive real number is flanked on either side by these infinitesimals--which are nonstandard real numbers--and that motion takes place in them.
Mahoney explores the mathematics of infinitesimals and suggests that the inability of mathematicians, and Cartesians in particular, to accept the new calculus was because the new discourse rested on new canons of mathematical and physical intelligibility.