infinitive


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Related to infinitive: bare infinitive, split infinitive

infinitive

An infinitive is the most basic form of a verb. It is “unmarked” (which means that it is not conjugated for tense or person), and it is preceded by the particle to.
Infinitives are known as non-finite verbs, meaning they do not express actions being performed by the subjects of clauses. Instead, infinitives function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs to describe actions as ideas.
Infinitives are distinct from a similar construction known as bare infinitives or the base forms of verbs, which are simply infinitives without the particle to.
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in·fin·i·tive

 (ĭn-fĭn′ĭ-tĭv)
n. Abbr. inf. or infin.
A verb form that functions as a substantive while retaining certain verbal characteristics, such as modification by adverbs, and that in English may be preceded by to, as in To go willingly is to show strength or We want him to work harder, or may also occur without to, as in She had them read the letter or We may finish today. See Usage Note at split infinitive.

[From Middle English infinitif, of an infinitive, from Old French, from Late Latin īnfīnītīvus, unlimited, indefinite, infinitive, from Latin īnfīnītus, infinite; see infinite.]

infinitive

(ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv)
n
(Grammar) a form of the verb not inflected for grammatical categories such as tense and person and used without an overt subject. In English, the infinitive usually consists of the word to followed by the verb
infinitival adj
inˈfinitively, ˌinfiniˈtivally adv

in•fin•i•tive

(ɪnˈfɪn ɪ tɪv)
n.
1. a nonfinite verb form, in many languages the simple or basic form of the verb, that names the action or state without specifying the subject and that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs or, in English, after the word to, as eat in I want to eat.
adj.
2. consisting of or containing an infinitive: an infinitive clause. Abbr.: infin.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin infīnītīvus, derivative of Latin infīnīt(us) indefinite, infinitival]

infinitive

The basic uninflected form of a verb, usually accompanied by “to” as in “to be.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infinitive - the uninflected form of the verb
split infinitive - an infinitive with an adverb between `to' and the verb (e.g., `to boldly go')
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Translations
صيغَة المَصْدَرمَصْدَرٌ
infinitivneurčitek
infinitivnavnemåde
infinitiivi
infinitiv
fõnévi igenévfőnévi igenév
nafnháttur
不定詞
부정사
bendratis
infinitīvs, nenoteiksme
infinitiv
neurčitok
nedoločnik
infinitiv
รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to
fiilin ...-mek/mak hâlimastarsonsuz
nguyên thể

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) → infinitivo
B. Ninfinitivo m

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv] n (GRAMMAR) [verb] → infinitif m

infinitive

(Gram)
adjInfinitiv-, infinitivisch; infinitive formInfinitivform f
nInfinitiv m, → Grundform f; in the infinitiveim Infinitiv

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → infinito/a
2. ninfinito
in the infinitive → all'infinito

infinitive

(inˈfinətiv) noun
the part of the verb used in English with or without to, that expresses an action but has no subject. The sentence `You need not stay if you want to go' contains two infinitives, stay and go.

infinitive

مَصْدَرٌ infinitiv infinitiv Infinitiv απαρέμφατο infinitivo infinitiivi infinitif infinitiv infinito 不定詞 부정사 infinitief infinitiv bezokolicznik infinitivo неопределенная форма глагола infinitiv รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to sonsuz nguyên thể 不定词
References in classic literature ?
You are so impatient, sir, you would come at the infinitive mood before you can get to the imperative.
Callaham's second argument, with regard to the independent infinitive absolute, is that it can stand in for any finite verbal form in a modal context without expressing any difference in nuance from the finite form: "[T]hey are capable substitutes for finite verbs by communicating a verbal idea and functioning modally" (p.
Complement sentences introduced by desiderative predicates express desire both with infinitive complements and with NP complements, as in (22).
However, in Estonian saama with the infinitive occurs in a rather narrow sense succeed in overcoming a barrier', e.
Companies announcing job growth include next generation Internet specialist Command Information which will add 300 jobs in the next 12 months, and management consultancy Infinitive, which will add 100 employees to its payroll.
Biblical Distribution of plene Spelling of qal Infinitive Construct from Strong Verbs (Pausal Forms in Parentheses) Book Total plene Percent plene Gen.
It is true that the introduction of both for's before the infinitive resulted from the loss of dative case, but what is crucial to note is their contrasting syntactic function.
In the modern Erzya literary language the illative infinitive in ms is attested in three vowel contexts, e.
The Infinitive Championship Series links a variety of local race events to encourage fitness in our community," stated Infinitive chief executive officer, Denis McFarlane.
For example, in Fula the infinitive when used as an action nominal takes the class marker -ki (the class marker of the noun class No.
Some other verbs present other peculiarities: an infinitive placed after a passive verb is normally a full infinitive.
SpeechWorks CEO, Stuart Patterson will kick-off the keynote series followed by industry leaders such as Steve Boehm, General Manager, First Union Direct; Kai-Fu Lee, Vice President of User Interface Technologies Division, Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT); Bill McIntyre, Manager of New Technologies and Distribution Planning, United Airlines (NYSE: UAL); and Brian Radloff, General Manager of Infinitive Speech Systems, a subsidiary of Visteon Corporation (NYSE: VC).