infinitive


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Related to infinitive: bare infinitive, split infinitive

infinitive

An infinitive is the most basic form of a verb. It is “unmarked” (which means that it is not conjugated for tense or person), and it is preceded by the particle to.
Infinitives are known as non-finite verbs, meaning they do not express actions being performed by the subjects of clauses. Instead, infinitives function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs to describe actions as ideas.
Infinitives are distinct from a similar construction known as bare infinitives or the base forms of verbs, which are simply infinitives without the particle to.
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in·fin·i·tive

 (ĭn-fĭn′ĭ-tĭv)
n. Abbr. inf. or infin.
A verb form that functions as a substantive while retaining certain verbal characteristics, such as modification by adverbs, and that in English may be preceded by to, as in To go willingly is to show strength or We want him to work harder, or may also occur without to, as in She had them read the letter or We may finish today. See Usage Note at split infinitive.

[From Middle English infinitif, of an infinitive, from Old French, from Late Latin īnfīnītīvus, unlimited, indefinite, infinitive, from Latin īnfīnītus, infinite; see infinite.]

infinitive

(ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv)
n
(Grammar) a form of the verb not inflected for grammatical categories such as tense and person and used without an overt subject. In English, the infinitive usually consists of the word to followed by the verb
infinitival adj
inˈfinitively, ˌinfiniˈtivally adv

in•fin•i•tive

(ɪnˈfɪn ɪ tɪv)
n.
1. a nonfinite verb form, in many languages the simple or basic form of the verb, that names the action or state without specifying the subject and that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs or, in English, after the word to, as eat in I want to eat.
adj.
2. consisting of or containing an infinitive: an infinitive clause. Abbr.: infin.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin infīnītīvus, derivative of Latin infīnīt(us) indefinite, infinitival]

infinitive

The basic uninflected form of a verb, usually accompanied by “to” as in “to be.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infinitive - the uninflected form of the verb
split infinitive - an infinitive with an adverb between `to' and the verb (e.g., `to boldly go')
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Translations
صيغَة المَصْدَرمَصْدَرٌ
infinitivneurčitek
infinitivnavnemåde
infinitiivi
infinitiv
fõnévi igenévfőnévi igenév
nafnháttur
不定詞
부정사
bendratis
infinitīvs, nenoteiksme
infinitiv
neurčitok
nedoločnik
infinitiv
รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to
fiilin ...-mek/mak hâlimastarsonsuz
nguyên thể

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) → infinitivo
B. Ninfinitivo m

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv] n (GRAMMAR) [verb] → infinitif m

infinitive

(Gram)
adjInfinitiv-, infinitivisch; infinitive formInfinitivform f
nInfinitiv m, → Grundform f; in the infinitiveim Infinitiv

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → infinito/a
2. ninfinito
in the infinitive → all'infinito

infinitive

(inˈfinətiv) noun
the part of the verb used in English with or without to, that expresses an action but has no subject. The sentence `You need not stay if you want to go' contains two infinitives, stay and go.

infinitive

مَصْدَرٌ infinitiv infinitiv Infinitiv απαρέμφατο infinitivo infinitiivi infinitif infinitiv infinito 不定詞 부정사 infinitief infinitiv bezokolicznik infinitivo неопределенная форма глагола infinitiv รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to sonsuz nguyên thể 不定词
References in classic literature ?
You are so impatient, sir, you would come at the infinitive mood before you can get to the imperative.
But the best move is the shift that occurs with the second infinitive.
I didn't know what a split infinitive was until my editor pointed it out to me deep into the last century when I was still wearing skinny ties.
None the least, even in Australia, Canada, England, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland, the United States and Wales - in all of which English has, for very many long centuries, been both the mother tongue and the commanding means of commerce, education, government, production and supplication to the deity - even there, very few individuals seem to have ever even heard of the word paid in any context other than as the past tense form of the infinitive to pay.
Their topics include restructuring at the syntax-semantics interface, the Romanian infinitive selected by perception and cognitive verbs, early modern Romanian infinitives: origin and replacement, semantic factors for the status of control infinitives in the history of German, and the emergence of expressions for purpose relations in older Indo-European languages.
Yet as this week's debate on the split infinitive has demonstrated, the rules of language can be flexible rather than fixed.
Note, however, that if the as well as phrase is linking a verb phrase to an infinitive phrase, the verb in the verb phrase should be a bare infinitive (the verb stem, without to):
The present note argues that the verbal root [square root of (term)]prns 'to distribute, supply' derives from Greek [pi][rho]ovo[eta][sigma][alpha]i, the aorist infinitive of [pi][rho]ovo[epsilon][omega] 'to perceive, foresee; to provide, take care of.
The verb dare, as well as most Present-Day English modal verbs (other than will), is considered a special verb because of its preterite-present morphology, the defective paradigm, the selection of bare infinitive (henceforth, BI) complementation, the lack of a third person singular--p ending and of participles.
The meaning of the future is expressed with the help of present tense forms in a particular context, as well as by periphrastic constructions, including an infinitive or participle next to the verb meaning 'be', or to a verb with a modal or phasal meaning.
In fact, expletives were a requirement when a sub-editor may have sought to embarrass a reporter who had committed the heinous crime of splitting an infinitive in a piece of copy.