infinitive

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infinitive

An infinitive is the most basic form of a verb. It is “unmarked” (which means that it is not conjugated for tense or person), and it is preceded by the particle to.
Infinitives are known as non-finite verbs, meaning they do not express actions being performed by the subjects of clauses. Instead, infinitives function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs to describe actions as ideas.
Infinitives are distinct from a similar construction known as bare infinitives or the base forms of verbs, which are simply infinitives without the particle to.
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in·fin·i·tive

 (ĭn-fĭn′ĭ-tĭv)
n. Abbr. inf. or infin.
A verb form that functions as a substantive while retaining certain verbal characteristics, such as modification by adverbs, and that in English may be preceded by to, as in To go willingly is to show strength or We want him to work harder, or may also occur without to, as in She had them read the letter or We may finish today. See Usage Note at split infinitive.

[From Middle English infinitif, of an infinitive, from Old French, from Late Latin īnfīnītīvus, unlimited, indefinite, infinitive, from Latin īnfīnītus, infinite; see infinite.]

infinitive

(ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv)
n
(Grammar) a form of the verb not inflected for grammatical categories such as tense and person and used without an overt subject. In English, the infinitive usually consists of the word to followed by the verb
infinitival adj
inˈfinitively, ˌinfiniˈtivally adv

in•fin•i•tive

(ɪnˈfɪn ɪ tɪv)
n.
1. a nonfinite verb form, in many languages the simple or basic form of the verb, that names the action or state without specifying the subject and that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs or, in English, after the word to, as eat in I want to eat.
adj.
2. consisting of or containing an infinitive: an infinitive clause. Abbr.: infin.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin infīnītīvus, derivative of Latin infīnīt(us) indefinite, infinitival]

infinitive

The basic uninflected form of a verb, usually accompanied by “to” as in “to be.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infinitive - the uninflected form of the verb
split infinitive - an infinitive with an adverb between `to' and the verb (e.g., `to boldly go')
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Translations
صيغَة المَصْدَرمَصْدَرٌ
infinitivneurčitek
infinitivnavnemåde
infinitiivi
infinitiv
fõnévi igenévfőnévi igenév
nafnháttur
不定詞
부정사
bendratis
infinitīvs, nenoteiksme
infinitiv
neurčitok
nedoločnik
infinitiv
รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to
fiilin ...-mek/mak hâlimastarsonsuz
nguyên thể

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) → infinitivo
B. Ninfinitivo m

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv] n (GRAMMAR) [verb] → infinitif m

infinitive

(Gram)
adjInfinitiv-, infinitivisch; infinitive formInfinitivform f
nInfinitiv m, → Grundform f; in the infinitiveim Infinitiv

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → infinito/a
2. ninfinito
in the infinitive → all'infinito

infinitive

(inˈfinətiv) noun
the part of the verb used in English with or without to, that expresses an action but has no subject. The sentence `You need not stay if you want to go' contains two infinitives, stay and go.

infinitive

مَصْدَرٌ infinitiv infinitiv Infinitiv απαρέμφατο infinitivo infinitiivi infinitif infinitiv infinito 不定詞 부정사 infinitief infinitiv bezokolicznik infinitivo неопределенная форма глагола infinitiv รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to sonsuz nguyên thể 不定词
References in periodicals archive ?
1] = 1, this is a standard infinitively lived agent model.
The deliberate obstruction of this critical task was, it is now clear, designed to make possible the present militarily ambiguous situations, which profit only Khartoum; Juba gains nothing from such indeterminate borders, and international policing is made infinitively more difficult in the absence of demarcation, indeed even delineation in far too many places.
Cooperative and non-cooperative game, evolutionary games, infinitively repeated games, multi-agent games, two-level games, nested games, fuzzy games, neutrosophic games, supergames, metagames, despite their value and their emphasis is on specific issues, all do not account for an environment in which multiple actors gradually become active parts of the game, as shown to be a real occurrence and supported by empirical evidence in political bargaining crises like those between Russia and its former satellites.