infinitive

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Related to Infinitives: split infinitives

infinitive

An infinitive is the most basic form of a verb. It is “unmarked” (which means that it is not conjugated for tense or person), and it is preceded by the particle to.
Infinitives are known as non-finite verbs, meaning they do not express actions being performed by the subjects of clauses. Instead, infinitives function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs to describe actions as ideas.
Infinitives are distinct from a similar construction known as bare infinitives or the base forms of verbs, which are simply infinitives without the particle to.
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in·fin·i·tive

 (ĭn-fĭn′ĭ-tĭv)
n. Abbr. inf. or infin.
A verb form that functions as a substantive while retaining certain verbal characteristics, such as modification by adverbs, and that in English may be preceded by to, as in To go willingly is to show strength or We want him to work harder, or may also occur without to, as in She had them read the letter or We may finish today. See Usage Note at split infinitive.

[From Middle English infinitif, of an infinitive, from Old French, from Late Latin īnfīnītīvus, unlimited, indefinite, infinitive, from Latin īnfīnītus, infinite; see infinite.]

infinitive

(ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv)
n
(Grammar) a form of the verb not inflected for grammatical categories such as tense and person and used without an overt subject. In English, the infinitive usually consists of the word to followed by the verb
infinitival adj
inˈfinitively, ˌinfiniˈtivally adv

in•fin•i•tive

(ɪnˈfɪn ɪ tɪv)
n.
1. a nonfinite verb form, in many languages the simple or basic form of the verb, that names the action or state without specifying the subject and that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs or, in English, after the word to, as eat in I want to eat.
adj.
2. consisting of or containing an infinitive: an infinitive clause. Abbr.: infin.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin infīnītīvus, derivative of Latin infīnīt(us) indefinite, infinitival]

infinitive

The basic uninflected form of a verb, usually accompanied by “to” as in “to be.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infinitive - the uninflected form of the verb
split infinitive - an infinitive with an adverb between `to' and the verb (e.g., `to boldly go')
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Translations
صيغَة المَصْدَرمَصْدَرٌ
infinitivneurčitek
infinitivnavnemåde
infinitiivi
infinitiv
fõnévi igenévfőnévi igenév
nafnháttur
不定詞
부정사
bendratis
infinitīvs, nenoteiksme
infinitiv
neurčitok
nedoločnik
infinitiv
รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to
fiilin ...-mek/mak hâlimastarsonsuz
nguyên thể

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) → infinitivo
B. Ninfinitivo m

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv] n (GRAMMAR) [verb] → infinitif m

infinitive

(Gram)
adjInfinitiv-, infinitivisch; infinitive formInfinitivform f
nInfinitiv m, → Grundform f; in the infinitiveim Infinitiv

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → infinito/a
2. ninfinito
in the infinitive → all'infinito

infinitive

(inˈfinətiv) noun
the part of the verb used in English with or without to, that expresses an action but has no subject. The sentence `You need not stay if you want to go' contains two infinitives, stay and go.

infinitive

مَصْدَرٌ infinitiv infinitiv Infinitiv απαρέμφατο infinitivo infinitiivi infinitif infinitiv infinito 不定詞 부정사 infinitief infinitiv bezokolicznik infinitivo неопределенная форма глагола infinitiv รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to sonsuz nguyên thể 不定词
References in classic literature ?
You are so impatient, sir, you would come at the infinitive mood before you can get to the imperative.
Although never one to split infinitives, isn't Mr Brocklebank correct in thinking that this should have read 'BienvenueMERSEYSIDE'S part in the Victorian mania for all things Japanese (lampooned by Gilbert & Sullivan's Mikado) was highlighted on BBC TV's Antiques Roadshow last weekend when a fabulous Japanese 'clobbered' vase was shown.
Geoff Parkin, on the other hand, dislikes split infinitives and the wrong pronunciation of kilometre.
In fact, he nearly parodies how free verse works, heavily enjambing lines between articles and noun clauses or prepositions and their objects, ending lines on conjunctions and breaking infinitives in two.
The article then argues that two linguistic theories do not adequately explain the overwhelming presence of infinitives in the three types of prose.
If you continue splitting your infinitives, you may do yourself a permanent mischief.
Other vexing verbal constructions include infinitives functioning as adjectives ("I need a book to read") and the ever-insidious dangling participle.
One of them, Greg Felton, argues that "there is no persuasive argument for split infinitives in SWE.
As may be seen from this table, the AAE speakers used a higher percentage of simple infinitives with same subject, relative clauses, infinitives with different subjects, and double embeddings sentence types than did the SAE speakers.
Participles dangle, metaphors are not only extended but mixed, infinitives are split and ambiguous pronouns abound.
They've been harder to split than infinitives or hairs or Penn and Teller.