infirm


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in·firm

 (ĭn-fûrm′)
adj.
1. Weak in body or mind, especially from old age or disease. See Synonyms at weak.
2. Not strong or stable; shaky: an infirm foundation.
3. Archaic Lacking firmness of will, character, or purpose; irresolute.

[Middle English infirme, from Old French, from Latin īnfirmus : in-, not; see in-1 + firmus, strong, firm; see dher- in Indo-European roots.]

in·firm′ly adv.

infirm

(ɪnˈfɜːm)
adj
1.
a. weak in health or body, esp from old age
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the infirm.
2. lacking moral certainty; indecisive or irresolute
3. not stable, sound, or secure: an infirm structure; an infirm claim.
4. (Law) law (of a law, custom, etc) lacking legal force; invalid
inˈfirmly adv
inˈfirmness n

in•firm

(ɪnˈfɜrm)

adj.
1. feeble or weak in body or health, esp. because of age.
2. unsteadfast, faltering, or irresolute, as persons or the mind.
3. not firm, solid, or strong.
4. unsound or invalid, as an argument or a property title.
[1325–75; Middle English infirme < Latin infirmus. See in-3, firm1]
in•firm′ly, adv.
in•firm′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.infirm - lacking bodily or muscular strength or vitality; "a feeble old woman"; "her body looked sapless"
frail - physically weak; "an invalid's frail body"
2.infirm - lacking firmness of will or character or purpose; "infirm of purpose; give me the daggers" - Shakespeare
irresolute - uncertain how to act or proceed; "the committee was timid and mediocre and irresolute"

infirm

adjective
2. irresolute, weak, faltering, unstable, shaky, insecure, wavering, wobbly, indecisive, unsound, vacillating She has little patience with the `infirm of purpose'.

infirm

adjective
Translations
عاجِز، واهٍ
vetchý
svagelig
veikburîa
besveikatisligotas
nespēcīgsvārgs
vetchý

infirm

[ɪnˈfɜːm] ADJ [person] (= weak) → débil, endeble; (= sickly) → enfermizo; (= ill) → enfermo
the old and infirmlos ancianos y enfermos
infirm of purposeirresoluto

infirm

[ɪnˈfɜːrm] adjinfirme

infirm

adjgebrechlich, schwach; infirm of purpose (liter)willensschwach, wenig zielstrebig

infirm

[ɪnˈfɜːm] adjinfermo/a

infirm

(inˈfəːm) adjective
(of a person) weak or ill. elderly and infirm people.
inˈfirmaryplural inˈfirmaries noun
a name given to some hospitals.
inˈfirmityplural inˈfirmities noun
weakness or illness.
References in classic literature ?
Sir Reginald is very infirm, and not likely to stand in your way long.
All these works, however, I am well convinced, will be dead long before this page shall offer itself to thy perusal; for however short the period may be of my own performances, they will most probably outlive their own infirm author, and the weakly productions of his abusive contemporaries.
Their people had all gone to the south, in pursuit of the buffalo, and had left these poor women behind, being too sick and infirm to travel.
Now, there is no occasion that any one should have the habit of body of a wrestler to be either a good citizen, or to enjoy a good constitution, or to be the father of healthy children; neither should he be infirm or too much dispirited by misfortunes, but between both these.
Crawling behind an infirm horse, a metropolitan hackney carriage drew up on wobbly wheels and with a maimed driver on the box.
I saw young girls stealing furtive glances at her; I saw young men gaze long and absorbedly at her; I saw aged, infirm men hang upon her charms with a pathetic interest.
Perhaps his mother now occupied a poorer seat, or possibly she had grown infirm and could not reach the church alone.
I tramped through the puddles and under the showery trees, mourning for Marguerite Gauthier as if she had died only yesterday, sighing with the spirit of 1840, which had sighed so much, and which had reached me only that night, across long years and several languages, through the person of an infirm old actress.
The venerable Father Ephraim sat in his easy chair, not only hoary headed and infirm with age, but worn down by a lingering disease, which, it was evident, would very soon transfer his patriarchal staff to other hands.
He was very old, nearly ninety years of age, and very infirm.
My father's health was still very infirm, but not materially worse than when I last saw him; and I was glad I had it in my power to cheer him by my return, and to amuse him with singing his favourite songs.
that a house serves no purpose, Arthur, in sheltering your infirm and afflicted--justly infirm and righteously afflicted--mother?