infirmity

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in·fir·mi·ty

 (ĭn-fûr′mĭ-tē)
n. pl. in·fir·mi·ties
1.
a. The condition of being infirm, often as associated with old age; weakness or frailty: the infirmity brought on by the disease.
b. A bodily ailment or weakness: complained about his infirmities.
2.
a. Weakness of resolution or character: the infirmity inherent in human nature.
b. A moral failing or defect in character: the infirmities and depravities of corrupt nobles.

infirmity

(ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being infirm
2. physical weakness or debility; frailty
3. a moral flaw or failing

in•fir•mi•ty

(ɪnˈfɜr mɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a physical weakness or ailment: the infirmities of age.
2. the quality or state of being infirm; lack of strength.
3. a moral weakness or failing.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infirmity - the state of being weak in health or body (especially from old age)
unfitness, softness - poor physical condition; being out of shape or out of condition (as from a life of ease and luxury)
asthenia, astheny - an abnormal loss of strength
cachexia, cachexy, wasting - any general reduction in vitality and strength of body and mind resulting from a debilitating chronic disease

infirmity

noun
1. frailty, ill health, debility, deficiency, imperfection, feebleness, decrepitude, sickliness In spite of his age and infirmity, he is still producing plays.
frailty health, strength, vigour, wellness, soundness
2. ailment, failing, weakness, fault, disorder, defect, sickness, malady Older people often try to ignore their infirmities.

infirmity

noun
1. A pathological condition of mind or body:
3. The condition of being sick:
4. An imperfection of character:
Translations
عاهَه، نَقيصَه، عَجْز
neduživostslabost
svagelighed
alkati gyengeség
heilsuveila, veikindi
dermansızlıkhastalıkzayıflık

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ] N (= state) → debilidad f; (= illness) → enfermedad f, achaque m, dolencia f; (= moral) → flaqueza f
mental/physical infirmityenfermedad f mental/física
the infirmities of (old) agelos achaques de la vejez

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːrmɪti] ninfirmité f

infirmity

nGebrechlichkeit f; the infirmities of (old) agedie Altersgebrechen pl; his infirmity of purpose (liter)seine Willensschwäche, sein Mangel man Zielstrebigkeit

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ] ninfermità f inv

infirm

(inˈfəːm) adjective
(of a person) weak or ill. elderly and infirm people.
inˈfirmaryplural inˈfirmaries noun
a name given to some hospitals.
inˈfirmityplural inˈfirmities noun
weakness or illness.

in·firm·i·ty

n. enfermedad.
References in classic literature ?
continued the deeply resentful and less self-restrained scout; "they say a time must come when all the deeds done in the flesh will be seen at a single look; and that by eyes cleared from mortal infirmities.
Had it been otherwise -- had an active politician been put into this influential post, to assume the easy task of making head against a Whig Collector, whose infirmities withheld him from the personal administration of his office -- hardly a man of the old corps would have drawn the breath of official life within a month after the exterminating angel had come up the Custom-House steps.
And to bear with my infirmities, Jane: to overlook my deficiencies.
Having satisfied herself on this point, she had no resource but to leave the rest to the natural incapability of retaining impressions -- unless those impressions were perpetually renewed -- which was one of the characteristic infirmities of her companion's weak mind.
Crackenthorp's desire, whenever your infirmities should make you unfitting; and it's one of the rights thereof to sing in the choir--else why have you done the same yourself?
But with the blood of this ancient royal race, many of their infirmities had descended to Athelstane.
A wiser and more useful philosophy, however, directs us to consider man according to the nature in which he was formed; subject to infirmities, which no wisdom can remedy; to weaknesses, which no institution can strengthen; to vices, which no legislation can correct.
It has not a little contributed to the infirmities of the existing federal system, that it never had a ratification by the PEOPLE.
The history of almost all the great councils and consultations held among mankind for reconciling their discordant opinions, assuaging their mutual jealousies, and adjusting their respective interests, is a history of factions, contentions, and disappointments, and may be classed among the most dark and degraded pictures which display the infirmities and depravities of the human character.
The caprices produced by physical infirmities are equally to be met with in the mental and moral regions.
The old man appeared to be listening attentively and as affectionately as his infirmities would allow to the Abbe Busoni, who looked cold and calm, as usual.
His aspect was stately and majestic, although his years and infirmities weighed heavily upon him, as if each year were a lump of lead, and each infirmity a ponderous stone, and all were bundled up together, and laid upon his weary shoulders.