infirmity


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in·fir·mi·ty

 (ĭn-fûr′mĭ-tē)
n. pl. in·fir·mi·ties
1.
a. The condition of being infirm, often as associated with old age; weakness or frailty: the infirmity brought on by the disease.
b. A bodily ailment or weakness: complained about his infirmities.
2.
a. Weakness of resolution or character: the infirmity inherent in human nature.
b. A moral failing or defect in character: the infirmities and depravities of corrupt nobles.

infirmity

(ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being infirm
2. physical weakness or debility; frailty
3. a moral flaw or failing

in•fir•mi•ty

(ɪnˈfɜr mɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a physical weakness or ailment: the infirmities of age.
2. the quality or state of being infirm; lack of strength.
3. a moral weakness or failing.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infirmity - the state of being weak in health or body (especially from old age)
unfitness, softness - poor physical condition; being out of shape or out of condition (as from a life of ease and luxury)
asthenia, astheny - an abnormal loss of strength
cachexia, cachexy, wasting - any general reduction in vitality and strength of body and mind resulting from a debilitating chronic disease

infirmity

noun
1. frailty, ill health, debility, deficiency, imperfection, feebleness, decrepitude, sickliness In spite of his age and infirmity, he is still producing plays.
frailty health, strength, vigour, wellness, soundness
2. ailment, failing, weakness, fault, disorder, defect, sickness, malady Older people often try to ignore their infirmities.

infirmity

noun
1. A pathological condition of mind or body:
3. The condition of being sick:
4. An imperfection of character:
Translations
عاهَه، نَقيصَه، عَجْز
neduživostslabost
svagelighed
alkati gyengeség
heilsuveila, veikindi
dermansızlıkhastalıkzayıflık

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ] N (= state) → debilidad f; (= illness) → enfermedad f, achaque m, dolencia f; (= moral) → flaqueza f
mental/physical infirmityenfermedad f mental/física
the infirmities of (old) agelos achaques de la vejez

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːrmɪti] ninfirmité f

infirmity

nGebrechlichkeit f; the infirmities of (old) agedie Altersgebrechen pl; his infirmity of purpose (liter)seine Willensschwäche, sein Mangel man Zielstrebigkeit

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ] ninfermità f inv

infirm

(inˈfəːm) adjective
(of a person) weak or ill. elderly and infirm people.
inˈfirmaryplural inˈfirmaries noun
a name given to some hospitals.
inˈfirmityplural inˈfirmities noun
weakness or illness.

in·firm·i·ty

n. enfermedad.
References in classic literature ?
She went once with Jo, but the old gentleman, not being aware of her infirmity, stared at her so hard from under his heavy eyebrows, and said "Hey
The moment he sat down, I noticed the nervous infirmity of which Mrs.
See," she continued, as if determined to shake off infirmity, in a sense of duty; "look around you, Major Heyward, and tell me what a prospect is this for the daughter of a soldier whose greatest happiness is his honor and his military renown.
We have already hinted that it is not our purpose to trace down the history of the Pyncheon family, in its unbroken connection with the House of the Seven Gables; nor to show, as in a magic picture, how the rustiness and infirmity of age gathered over the venerable house itself.
With the customary infirmity of temper that characterizes this unhappy fowl, she appears by the fierceness of her beak and eye, and the general truculency of her attitude, to threaten mischief to the inoffensive community; and especially to warn all citizens careful of their safety against intruding on the premises which she overshadows with her wings.
Full in this rapid wake, and many fathoms in the rear, swam a huge, humped old bull, which by his comparatively slow progress, as well as by the unusual yellowish incrustations overgrowing him, seemed afflicted with the jaundice, or some other infirmity.
When is a man to be safe from such wit, if age and infirmity will not protect him?
It was mournful, indeed, to witness the subjugation of that vigorous spirit to a corporeal infirmity.
Lorry's eye caught his, he was taken with that peculiar kind of short cough requiring the hollow of a hand before it, which is seldom, if ever, known to be an infirmity attendant on perfect openness of character.
Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid twopence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Neither duty nor infirmity could keep youth or age from such exhibitions.
I have indeed observed the same disposition among most of the mathematicians I have known in Europe, although I could never discover the least analogy between the two sciences; unless those people suppose, that because the smallest circle has as many degrees as the largest, therefore the regulation and management of the world require no more abilities than the handling and turning of a globe; but I rather take this quality to spring from a very common infirmity of human nature, inclining us to be most curious and conceited in matters where we have least concern, and for which we are least adapted by study or nature.