infirm


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in·firm

 (ĭn-fûrm′)
adj.
1. Weak in body or mind, especially from old age or disease. See Synonyms at weak.
2. Not strong or stable; shaky: an infirm foundation.
3. Archaic Lacking firmness of will, character, or purpose; irresolute.

[Middle English infirme, from Old French, from Latin īnfirmus : in-, not; see in-1 + firmus, strong, firm; see dher- in Indo-European roots.]

in·firm′ly adv.

infirm

(ɪnˈfɜːm)
adj
1.
a. weak in health or body, esp from old age
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the infirm.
2. lacking moral certainty; indecisive or irresolute
3. not stable, sound, or secure: an infirm structure; an infirm claim.
4. (Law) law (of a law, custom, etc) lacking legal force; invalid
inˈfirmly adv
inˈfirmness n

in•firm

(ɪnˈfɜrm)

adj.
1. feeble or weak in body or health, esp. because of age.
2. unsteadfast, faltering, or irresolute, as persons or the mind.
3. not firm, solid, or strong.
4. unsound or invalid, as an argument or a property title.
[1325–75; Middle English infirme < Latin infirmus. See in-3, firm1]
in•firm′ly, adv.
in•firm′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.infirm - lacking bodily or muscular strength or vitality; "a feeble old woman"; "her body looked sapless"
frail - physically weak; "an invalid's frail body"
2.infirm - lacking firmness of will or character or purpose; "infirm of purpose; give me the daggers" - Shakespeare
irresolute - uncertain how to act or proceed; "the committee was timid and mediocre and irresolute"

infirm

adjective
2. irresolute, weak, faltering, unstable, shaky, insecure, wavering, wobbly, indecisive, unsound, vacillating She has little patience with the `infirm of purpose'.

infirm

adjective
Translations
عاجِز، واهٍ
vetchý
svagelig
veikburîa
besveikatisligotas
nespēcīgsvārgs
vetchý

infirm

[ɪnˈfɜːm] ADJ [person] (= weak) → débil, endeble; (= sickly) → enfermizo; (= ill) → enfermo
the old and infirmlos ancianos y enfermos
infirm of purposeirresoluto

infirm

[ɪnˈfɜːrm] adjinfirme

infirm

adjgebrechlich, schwach; infirm of purpose (liter)willensschwach, wenig zielstrebig

infirm

[ɪnˈfɜːm] adjinfermo/a

infirm

(inˈfəːm) adjective
(of a person) weak or ill. elderly and infirm people.
inˈfirmaryplural inˈfirmaries noun
a name given to some hospitals.
inˈfirmityplural inˈfirmities noun
weakness or illness.
References in classic literature ?
Beth cherished them all the more tenderly for that very reason, and set up a hospital for infirm dolls.
I tramped through the puddles and under the showery trees, mourning for Marguerite Gauthier as if she had died only yesterday, sighing with the spirit of 1840, which had sighed so much, and which had reached me only that night, across long years and several languages, through the person of an infirm old actress.
Some bore their choicest articles, others their young, and some their aged and infirm, into the forest, which spread itself like a verdant carpet of bright green against the side of the mountain.
On the shores of our free states are emerging the poor, shattered, broken remnants of families,--men and women, escaped, by miraculous providences from the surges of slavery,--feeble in knowledge, and, in many cases, infirm in moral constitution, from a system which confounds and confuses every principle of Christianity and morality.
I saw young girls stealing furtive glances at her; I saw young men gaze long and absorbedly at her; I saw aged, infirm men hang upon her charms with a pathetic interest.
mixed with the air I breathed; and besides, I remembered I had once been her husband--that recollection was then, and is now, inexpressibly odious to me; moreover, I knew that while she lived I could never be the husband of another and better wife; and, though five years my senior (her family and her father had lied to me even in the particular of her age), she was likely to live as long as I, being as robust in frame as she was infirm in mind.
Although I can't afford to take this course, I see no objection to having her comfortably boarded and lodged out of our way for the time being -- say, at a retired farm-house, in the character of a lady in infirm mental health.
I never knew my mother afterwards to give an opinion on any matter, without first appealing to Miss Murdstone, or without having first ascertained by some sure means, what Miss Murdstone's opinion was; and I never saw Miss Murdstone, when out of temper (she was infirm that way), move her hand towards her bag as if she were going to take out the keys and offer to resign them to my mother, without seeing that my mother was in a terrible fright.
I could think of no better expedient, and therefore went away in the night between the 23rd and 24th of April with my comrade, an old man, very infirm and very timorous.
The thing puzzled me, and I was led to make a further remark, which puzzled me still more: that aged and infirm among this people there were none.
I am completely ignorant of it, madame," said the cardinal, accompanying his words with a slight shrug of the shoulders; "alas, our own wars quite absorb the time and the mind of a poor, incapable, infirm old minister like me.
The venerable Father Ephraim sat in his easy chair, not only hoary headed and infirm with age, but worn down by a lingering disease, which, it was evident, would very soon transfer his patriarchal staff to other hands.