inflame


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in·flame

 (ĭn-flām′)
v. in·flamed, in·flam·ing, in·flames
v.tr.
1. To arouse to passionate feeling or action: crimes that inflamed the entire community.
2. To make more violent; intensify: "inflamed to madness an already savage nature" (Robert Graves).
3.
a. To cause (the skin) to redden or grow hot, as from strong emotion or stimulants.
b. To turn red or make glow: Great bonfires inflamed the night.
4. To produce inflammation in (a tissue or organ).
5. To set on fire; kindle.
v.intr.
1. To become excited or aroused.
2. To be affected by inflammation.
3. To catch fire.

[Middle English enflaumen, from Old French enflammer, from Latin īnflammāre : in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + flammāre, to set on fire (from flamma, flame; see bhel- in Indo-European roots).]

in·flam′er n.

inflame

(ɪnˈfleɪm)
vb
1. to arouse or become aroused to violent emotion
2. (tr) to increase or intensify; aggravate
3. (Pathology) to produce inflammation in (a tissue, organ, or part) or (of a tissue, etc) to become inflamed
4. to set or be set on fire; kindle
5. (tr) to cause to redden
inˈflamer n
inˈflamingly adv

in•flame

(ɪnˈfleɪm)

v. -flamed, -flam•ing. v.t.
1. to kindle or excite (passions, desires, etc.).
2. to arouse to a high degree of passion or feeling; incite.
3. to cause inflammation in.
4. to raise (the blood, bodily tissue, etc.) to a feverish heat.
5. to set aflame or afire.
6. to redden with or as with flames.
v.i.
7. to burst into flame; take fire.
8. to be kindled, as passion.
9. to become infused with passion.
10. to become excessively affected with inflammation.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French < Latin inflammāre to kindle]
in•flam′ed•ness, n.
in•flam′er, n.
in•flam′ing•ly, adv.
syn: See kindle.

inflame


Past participle: inflamed
Gerund: inflaming

Imperative
inflame
inflame
Present
I inflame
you inflame
he/she/it inflames
we inflame
you inflame
they inflame
Preterite
I inflamed
you inflamed
he/she/it inflamed
we inflamed
you inflamed
they inflamed
Present Continuous
I am inflaming
you are inflaming
he/she/it is inflaming
we are inflaming
you are inflaming
they are inflaming
Present Perfect
I have inflamed
you have inflamed
he/she/it has inflamed
we have inflamed
you have inflamed
they have inflamed
Past Continuous
I was inflaming
you were inflaming
he/she/it was inflaming
we were inflaming
you were inflaming
they were inflaming
Past Perfect
I had inflamed
you had inflamed
he/she/it had inflamed
we had inflamed
you had inflamed
they had inflamed
Future
I will inflame
you will inflame
he/she/it will inflame
we will inflame
you will inflame
they will inflame
Future Perfect
I will have inflamed
you will have inflamed
he/she/it will have inflamed
we will have inflamed
you will have inflamed
they will have inflamed
Future Continuous
I will be inflaming
you will be inflaming
he/she/it will be inflaming
we will be inflaming
you will be inflaming
they will be inflaming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been inflaming
you have been inflaming
he/she/it has been inflaming
we have been inflaming
you have been inflaming
they have been inflaming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been inflaming
you will have been inflaming
he/she/it will have been inflaming
we will have been inflaming
you will have been inflaming
they will have been inflaming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been inflaming
you had been inflaming
he/she/it had been inflaming
we had been inflaming
you had been inflaming
they had been inflaming
Conditional
I would inflame
you would inflame
he/she/it would inflame
we would inflame
you would inflame
they would inflame
Past Conditional
I would have inflamed
you would have inflamed
he/she/it would have inflamed
we would have inflamed
you would have inflamed
they would have inflamed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.inflame - cause inflammation in; "The repetitive motion inflamed her joint"
inflame - become inflamed; get sore; "His throat inflamed"
aggravate, exacerbate, worsen, exasperate - make worse; "This drug aggravates the pain"
2.inflame - catch fire; "The dried grass of the prairie kindled, spreading the flames for miles"
flare up - ignite quickly and suddenly, especially after having died down; "the fire flared up and died down once again"
3.inflame - cause to start burning; "The setting sun kindled the sky with oranges and reds"
ignite, light - cause to start burning; subject to fire or great heat; "Great heat can ignite almost any dry matter"; "Light a cigarette"
rekindle - kindle anew, as of a fire
4.inflame - arouse or excite feelings and passionsinflame - arouse or excite feelings and passions; "The ostentatious way of living of the rich ignites the hatred of the poor"; "The refugees' fate stirred up compassion around the world"; "Wake old feelings of hatred"
arouse, elicit, evoke, provoke, enkindle, kindle, fire, raise - call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy"
ferment - work up into agitation or excitement; "Islam is fermenting Africa"
5.inflame - become inflamed; get sore; "His throat inflamed"
inflame - cause inflammation in; "The repetitive motion inflamed her joint"
decline, worsen - grow worse; "Conditions in the slum worsened"

inflame

verb
1. enrage, stimulate, provoke, fire, heat, excite, anger, arouse, rouse, infuriate, ignite, incense, madden, agitate, kindle, rile, foment, intoxicate, make your blood boil, impassion They hold the rebels responsible for inflaming the situation.
enrage cool, quiet, calm, discourage, suppress, soothe, extinguish, allay, pacify, quench
2. aggravate, increase, intensify, worsen, exacerbate, fan The shooting has only inflamed passions further.

inflame

verb
2. To cause to become sore or inflamed:
Translations
يُثير، يُلْهِبُ المشاعِر، يُغْضِبُ
roznítitvzplanout
ophidse
feldühösít
æsa upp
apimtas uždegimouždegti
iekvēlinātuzbudināt
alevlendirmekkörüklemek

inflame

[ɪnˈfleɪm] VT
1. (Med) [+ wound] → inflamar
to become inflamedinflamarse
2. (fig) [+ person, feelings] → encender, inflamar; [+ situation] → exacerbar; [+ conflict] → avivar, exacerbar
to be inflamed with passion/anger/jealousyestar inflamado de pasión/ira/celos

inflame

[ɪnˈfleɪm] vt [+ situation] → envenimer; [+ feelings] → attiser
to inflame passions → déchaîner les passions

inflame

vt
(Med) → entzünden; her eyes were inflamed from cryingihre Augen waren vom Weinen gerötet; to become inflamed (wound, eyes etc) → sich entzünden
personerzürnen, aufbringen; feelingsentflammen, entfachen; situation, public opinionanheizen; his speech inflamed the peopleseine Rede brachte die Menge auf; they were inflamed by the newsdie Nachricht brachte sie auf; inflamed with passion he …von glühender Leidenschaft erfasst, er …; he was inflamed with rage/jealousy etcer glühte vor Zorn/Eifersucht etc

inflame

[ɪnˈfleɪm] vt
a. (Med) (wound) → infiammare
to become inflamed → infiammarsi
b. (fig) (feelings, passions) → accendere; (person) → far incollerire

inflame

(inˈfleim) verb
to cause (feelings etc) to become violent.
inˈflamed adjective
hot and red especially because of infection. Her throat was very inflamed.

inflame

v. inflamar; inflamarse.
References in classic literature ?
Resistance only served to inflame the murderers, who inflicted their furious blows long after their victims were beyond the power of their resentment.
He never took all the straw away, and the smell from what lay underneath was very bad; while the strong vapors that rose made my eyes smart and inflame, and I did not feel the same appetite for my food.
Another part in Squadrons and gross Bands, On bold adventure to discover wide That dismal world, if any Clime perhaps Might yeild them easier habitation, bend Four ways thir flying March, along the Banks Of four infernal Rivers that disgorge Into the burning Lake thir baleful streams; Abhorred STYX the flood of deadly hate, Sad ACHERON of sorrow, black and deep; COCYTUS, nam'd of lamentation loud Heard on the ruful stream; fierce PHLEGETON Whose waves of torrent fire inflame with rage.
Our age is too enlightened to contend upon topics which concern only the interests of eternity; the men who hold in proper contempt all controversies about trifles, except such as inflame their own passions, have made it a commonplace censure against your ancestors, that their zeal was enkindled by subjects of trivial importance; and that however aggrieved by the intolerance of others, they were alike intolerant themselves.
As she appeared to him in her dressing-gown, she drove all the beauties he had seen until then out of his recollection; speech failed him, his head turned, he was spell-bound, and in the end love-smitten, as you will see in the course of the story of my misfortune; and to inflame still further his passion, which he hid from me and revealed to Heaven alone, it so happened that one day he found a note of hers entreating me to demand her of her father in marriage, so delicate, so modest, and so tender, that on reading it he told me that in Luscinda alone were combined all the charms of beauty and understanding that were distributed among all the other women in the world.
Specious arguments of danger to the common liberty could easily be contrived; plausible excuses for the deficiencies of the party could, without difficulty, be invented to alarm the apprehensions, inflame the passions, and conciliate the good-will, even of those States which were not chargeable with any violation or omission of duty.
But young people's tears have very little saltness or acidity in them, and do not inflame the eyes so much as those of grown persons; so that it is not to be wondered at, if, a few moments afterwards, Proserpina was sporting through the hall almost as merrily as she and the four sea nymphs had sported along the edge of the surf wave.
Jones, when he had finished, and finished for the second time, after tying the linen in every shape and form that it could be placed; “reach me the scissors, for here is a thread that must be cut off, or it might get under the dressings, and inflame the wound.
As for discontentments, they are, in the politic body, like to humors in the natural, which are apt to gather a preternatural heat, and to inflame.
A shade crossed the brow of both visitors; for the other room was the private room of the great actor with whom Miss Aurora was performing, and she was of the kind that does not inflame admiration without inflaming jealousy.
It is therefore plain what instruments they should use; thus, they should never be taught to play upon the flute, or any other instrument which requires great skill, as the harp or the like, but on such as will make them good judges of music, or any other instruction: besides, the flute is not a moral instrument, but rather one that will inflame the passions, and is therefore rather to be used when the soul is to be animated than when instruction is intended.
They say, who know, that it would need but slight provocation to inflame the two to war.