inflexibility


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

in·flex·i·ble

 (ĭn-flĕk′sə-bəl)
adj.
1. Not easily bent; stiff or rigid. See stiff.
2. Incapable of being changed; unalterable: an inflexible rule.
3. Refusing to change one's attitude, purpose, or principles; immovable: an inflexible disciplinarian.

in·flex′i·bil′i·ty, in·flex′i·ble·ness n.
in·flex′i·bly adv.

Flexibility/Inflexibility

 

See Also: HABIT

  1. Adaptable as a Norwegian wharf rat —James Mills
  2. Adjustable as prices of goods sold in a flea market —Anon
  3. Adjust to as your eyes adjust to darkness or sudden light —Anon
  4. Be pliable like a reed, not rigid like a cedar —Rabbi Simeon ben Eleazar
  5. Elastic as a criminal’s conscience —Anon
  6. Elastic as a steel spring —Anon
  7. Flexible as a diplomat’s conscience —Anon
  8. Flexible as figures in the hands of the statistician —Israel Zangwill
  9. Flexible as silk —Ouida
  10. Has as much give as a tree trunk —Jimmy Breslin
  11. Implacable an adversary as a wife suing for alimony —William Wycherly
  12. (Softly, unhurriedly but) implacably, like a great river flowing on and on —Harvey Swados
  13. Inflexible as a marble pillar —Anon
  14. Inflexible as steel —Ouida
  15. Inflexible as the rings of hell —John Cheever
  16. Intractable as a driven ghost —Sylvia Plath
  17. Like all weak men he laid an exaggerated stress on not changing one’s mind —W. Somerset Maugham
  18. (The adolescent personality is as) malleable as infant flesh —Barbara Lazear Ascher, New York Times/Hers, October 23, 1986
  19. The man who never alters his opinion is like standing water, and breeds reptiles of the mind —William Blake
  20. Mind set like concrete —George Garrett
  21. Pliable as wax —James Shirley
  22. Pliant as cloth —Eugene Sue
  23. Pliant as flesh —Linda Pastan
  24. Rigidity yielding a little, like justice swayed by mercy, is the whole beauty of the earth —G. K. Chesterton
  25. Set as a piece of sculpture —Charles Dickens
  26. They made their hearts as an adamant stone —The Holy Bible/Apocrypha

    A variation from “Hearts firm as stone” and “Cold as stone” from the Book of Job.

  27. Uncompromising as a policeman’s club —Anon
  28. Uncompromising as justice —William Lloyd Garrison
  29. (There he was, as) unshakable as granite —Frank Swinnerton
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inflexibility - a lack of physical flexibility
rigidity, rigidness - the physical property of being stiff and resisting bending
flexibility, flexibleness - the property of being flexible; easily bent or shaped
2.inflexibility - the quality of being rigid and rigorously severe
unadaptability - the inability to change or be changed to fit changed circumstances
flexibility, flexibleness - the quality of being adaptable or variable; "he enjoyed the flexibility of his working arrangement"

inflexibility

noun obstinacy, persistence, intransigence, obduracy, fixity, steeliness She was irritated by the inflexibility of her colleagues.

inflexibility

noun
Translations
عَدم مُرونَه، عَدم الإنثِناء، صَلابَه
neoblomnost
stivhedubøjelighedurokkelighed
hajlíthatatlanság
ósveigjanleiki
neochvejnosťneohybnosť
bükülmezlik

inflexibility

[ɪnˌfleksɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] N [of substance, object] → rigidez f (fig) [of person, opinions, rules] → inflexibilidad f

inflexibility

[ɪnˌflɛksɪˈbɪlɪti] n
[scheme, system] → rigidité f
[person] → inflexibilité f

inflexibility

n (lit)Unbiegsamkeit f, → Starrheit f; (fig)Unbeugsamkeit f, → Sturheit f (pej)

inflexibility

[ɪnˌflɛksɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] n (see adj) → rigidità, inflessibilità

inflexible

(inˈfleksəbl) adjective
1. (of a person) never yielding or giving way.
2. not able to bend.
inˈflexibly adverb
inˌflexiˈbility noun
References in classic literature ?
The strong glare of the fire fell full upon his sturdy, weather-beaten countenance and forest attire, lending an air of romantic wildness to the aspect of an individual, who, seen by the sober light of day, would have exhibited the peculiarities of a man remarkable for the strangeness of his dress, the iron-like inflexibility of his frame, and the singular compound of quick, vigilant sagacity, and of exquisite simplicity, that by turns usurped the possession of his muscular features.
Such, gentlemen, is the inflexibility of sea-usages and the instinctive love of neatness in seamen; some of whom would not willingly drown without first washing their faces.
This was the easier, in that she was perfect mistress of that diplomatic art which unites the utmost subservience of manner with the utmost inflexibility as to measure.
There was an inflexibility in her face, in her voice, in her gait and carriage, amply sufficient to account for the effect she had made upon a gentle creature like my mother; but her features were rather handsome than otherwise, though unbending and austere.
There is abundant reason, nevertheless, to suppose that immaterial as these objections were, they would have been adhered to with a very dangerous inflexibility, in some States, had not a zeal for their opinions and supposed interests been stifled by the more powerful sentiment of selfpreservation.
He spoke in a voice of the procureur-general, with the rigid inflexibility of neck and shoulders which caused his flatterers to say (as we have before observed) that he was the living statue of the law.
Athos knew his own personal value, and bowed to the prince like a man, correcting by something sympathetic and undefinable that which might have appeared offensive to the pride of the highest rank in the inflexibility of his attitude.
He was all fidelity, inflexibility, and sombre conviction, but like some great saints he had very little body to keep all these merits in.
He was still the old Roman in inflexibility of purpose; but grafted on to the Roman was a new Berserker fury.
Our spoilt little woman," said my guardian, "shall have her own way even in her inflexibility, though at the price, I know, of tears downstairs.
In the bosom of this family, bound together by the force of religious ties, by the inflexibility of its customs, by one solitary emotion, that of avarice, a passion which was now as it were its compass, Elisabeth was forced to commune with herself, instead of imparting her ideas to those around her, for she felt herself without equals in mind who could comprehend her.
This solemn proceeding always took place in the afternoon of the day succeeding his return; perhaps, because the boys acquired strength of mind from the suspense of the morning, or, possibly, because Mr Squeers himself acquired greater sternness and inflexibility from certain warm potations in which he was wont to indulge after his early dinner.