infraction

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in·frac·tion

 (ĭn-frăk′shən)
n.
The act or an instance of infringing, as of a law or rule; a violation. See Synonyms at breach.

in•frac•tion

(ɪnˈfræk ʃən)

n.
breach; violation; infringement.
[1615–25; < Latin infrāctiō. See infract, -tion]
syn: See breach.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infraction - a crime less serious than a felony
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
breach of the peace, disorderly behavior, disorderly conduct, disturbance of the peace - any act of molesting, interrupting, hindering, agitating, or arousing from a state of repose or otherwise depriving inhabitants of the peace and quiet to which they are entitled
false pretence, false pretense - (law) an offense involving intent to defraud and false representation and obtaining property as a result of that misrepresentation
indecent exposure, public nudity - vulgar and offensive nakedness in a public place
bearing false witness, lying under oath, perjury - criminal offense of making false statements under oath
sedition - an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority and tending to cause the disruption or overthrow of the government

infraction

noun violation, breach, infringement, breaking, trespass, transgression, contravention, nonfulfilment Another infraction would mean a stint in a probation centre.

infraction

noun
An act or instance of breaking a law or regulation or of nonfulfillment of an obligation or promise, for example:
Translations

infraction

[ɪnˈfrækʃən] Ninfracción f, contravención f

infraction

n
(= infringement)Verletzung f, → Verstoß m
(Med) → Infraktion f (spec), → Knickbruch m

in·frac·tion

a. infracción, fractura ósea incompleta sin desplazamiento.
References in periodicals archive ?
Miguel Escobar, spokesman for the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, said the Flores conviction proves that his government is "quite serious about prosecuting infractors of the law.
Penalties against corporate infractors, if decreed, are mitigated with the help of taxpayers' money since the government in question pays the corporate fine, and big business is spared.
In spite of severe penalties against infractors, the system leaves room for fraudulent operations.