infuriated


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in·fu·ri·ate

 (ĭn-fyo͝or′ē-āt′)
tr.v. in·fu·ri·at·ed, in·fu·ri·at·ing, in·fu·ri·ates
To make furious; enrage.
adj. (ĭn-fyo͝or′ē-ĭt) Archaic
Furious.

[Medieval Latin īnfuriāre, īnfuriāt- : Latin in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + Latin furiāre, to enrage (from furia, fury; see fury).]

in·fu′ri·at′ing·ly adv.
in·fu′ri·a′tion n.

infuriated

(ɪnˈfjʊərɪˌeɪtɪd)
adj
furious
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.infuriated - marked by extreme angerinfuriated - marked by extreme anger; "the enraged bull attached"; "furious about the accident"; "a furious scowl"; "infuriated onlookers charged the police who were beating the boy"; "could not control the maddened crowd"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"

infuriated

adjective angry, mad (informal), furious, heated, raging, provoked, outraged, annoyed, passionate, irritated, hacked (off) (U.S. slang), choked, pissed (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), incensed, enraged, exasperated, resentful, nettled, indignant, pissed off (taboo slang), irate, riled, up in arms, incandescent, antagonized, piqued, hot under the collar (informal), on the warpath, foaming at the mouth, choleric, splenetic, wrathful, in high dudgeon, ireful He realized how infuriated this would make me.
Translations

infuriated

[ɪnˈfjʊəriətɪd] adjfurieux/euse
"That's absolute rubbish!" said the infuriated Colin → "Ce ne sont que des fadaises!" dit Colin, furieux.
to be infuriated with sb → être furieux/euse contre qn
to be infuriated by sth → être rendu furieux/euse par qch
The champion was infuriated by the decision → Le champion fut rendu furieux par la décision.
References in classic literature ?
It was a pictorial sheet, and Jo examined the work of art nearest her, idly wondering what fortuitous concatenation of circumstances needed the melodramatic illustration of an Indian in full war costume, tumbling over a precipice with a wolf at his throat, while two infuriated young gentlemen, with unnaturally small feet and big eyes, were stabbing each other close by, and a disheveled female was flying away in the background with her mouth wide open.
But Lena Lingard only laughed her lazy, good-natured laugh and rode on, gazing back over her shoulder at Ole's infuriated wife.
Avoiding the horns of the infuriated animal, Uncas darted to his side, and passed his knife across the throat, when bounding to the edge of the river it fell, dyeing the waters with its blood.
I translated a passage one day, which said that "the infuriated tigress broke loose and utterly ate up the unfortunate fir forest"
The Fairy entered with them, and warned the Queen that the Wizard King would shortly arrive, infuriated by his loss, and that nothing could preserve the Prince and Princess from his rage and magic unless they were actually married.
The infuriated attackers were almost on the point of hewing the stout outlaws to pieces, when the Sheriff cried:
Infuriated by political animosity, the wives in many a noble household wearied their lords with prayers to give up their opposition to the Colour Bill; and some, finding their entreaties fruitless, fell on and slaughtered their innocent children and husband, perishing themselves in the act of carnage.
Without more ado, therefore, I turned to meet the charge of the infuriated bull ape.
With this he now returned to the box; but when he had threatened Ajax with it but once he found himself facing two infuriated enemies instead of one, for the boy had leaped to his feet, and seizing a chair was standing ready at the ape's side to defend his new found friend.
By three, people were being trampled and crushed even in Bishopsgate Street, a couple of hundred yards or more from Liverpool Street station; revolvers were fired, people stabbed, and the policemen who had been sent to direct the traffic, exhausted and infuriated, were breaking the heads of the people they were called out to protect.
Such a gentleman simply dashes straight for his object like an infuriated bull with its horns down, and nothing but a wall will stop him.
Your horses got as far as Ranelagh, when they darted forward like mad things, and galloped away at so fearful a rate, that there seemed no other prospect for myself and my poor Edward but that of being dashed to pieces against the first object that impeded their progress, when a strange-looking man, -- an Arab, a negro, or a Nubian, at least a black of some nation or other -- at a signal from the count, whose domestic he is, suddenly seized and stopped the infuriated animals, even at the risk of being trampled to death himself; and certainly he must have had a most wonderful escape.