infused


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in·fuse

 (ĭn-fyo͞oz′)
tr.v. in·fused, in·fus·ing, in·fus·es
1. To put into or introduce as if by pouring: infused new vigor into the movement.
2. To fill or cause to be filled with something: infused them with a love of the land.
3. To steep or soak without boiling in order to extract soluble elements or active principles.
4. To flavor or scent (a liquid) by steeping ingredients in it: "He would infuse ... vegetable oil with the pungent taste of scallions" (Nina Simonds).
5. To introduce (a solution) into the body through a vein for therapeutic purposes.

[Middle English infusen, from Old French infuser, from Latin īnfundere, īnfūs- : in-, in; see in-2 + fundere, to pour; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

in·fus′er n.
Translations

infused

pp. de infundir, que se refiere a líquidos administrados por vía de una vena. V.: venoclysis
References in classic literature ?
MEN'S thoughts, are much according to their inclination; their discourse and speeches, according to their learning and infused opinions; but their deeds, are after as they have been accustomed.
The sky over them was like a jewelled cup from which the dusk was pouring; the air was crisp with the compelling tang of the sea, and the whole landscape was infused with the subtleties of a sea evening.
And I repeat to you again, if it was a fit thing to be proud, I might claim the honour of having infused that idea.
This visit had infused new vigor into Dantes; he had, till then, forgotten the date; but now, with a fragment of plaster, he wrote the date, 30th July, 1816, and made a mark every day, in order not to lose his reckoning again.
The advent of Rebecca had somehow infused a new spirit into these hitherto terrible afternoons.
Three kings protested to me, "that in their whole reigns they never did once prefer any person of merit, unless by mistake, or treachery of some minister in whom they confided; neither would they do it if they were to live again:" and they showed, with great strength of reason, "that the royal throne could not be supported without corruption, because that positive, confident, restiff temper, which virtue infused into a man, was a perpetual clog to public business.
Today we do more than celebrate America, we rededicate ourselves to the very idea of America, an idea born in revolution, and renewed through two centuries of challenge, an idea tempered by the knowledge that but for fate, we, the fortunate and the unfortunate, might have been each other; an idea ennobled by the faith that our nation can summon from its myriad diversity, the deepest measure of unity; an idea infused with the conviction that America's journey long, heroic journey must go forever upward.
Here Don Quixote, too, broke silence, saying to Sancho, "Have patience, my son, and gratify these noble persons, and give all thanks to heaven that it has infused such virtue into thy person, that by its sufferings thou canst disenchant the enchanted and restore to life the dead.
That the mass seemed moving ever away from Lewes indicated that the King's arms were winning toward victory, and so it might have been had not a new element been infused into the battle; for now upon the brow of the hill to the north of them appeared a great horde of armored knights, and as they came into position where they could view the battle the leader raised his sword on high, and, as one man, the thousand broke into a mad charge.
You were the moving power of all this machinery before my birth; your stronger spirit has been infused into all my father's dealings for more than two score years.
It was impossible to doubt that, whatever painful efficacy there might be in the secret sting of remorse, a deadlier venom had been infused into it by the hand that proffered relief.
Yet, human fellowship infused some nourishment into the flinty viands, and struck some sparks of cheerfulness out of them.