infusible


Also found in: Medical.

in·fus·i·ble

 (ĭn-fyo͞o′zə-bəl)
adj.
Suitable for infusion; capable of being infused.

in·fus′i·bil′i·ty, in·fus′i·ble·ness n.

infusible

(ɪnˈfjuːzəbəl)
adj
not fusible; not easily melted; having a high melting point
[C16: from in-1 + fusible]
inˌfusiˈbility, inˈfusibleness n

infusible

(ɪnˈfjuːzəbəl)
adj
capable of being infused
[C17: from infuse + -ible]
inˌfusiˈbility, inˈfusibleness n
References in classic literature ?
Our cannon must be possessed of great tenacity, great hardness, be infusible by heat, indissoluble, and inoxidable by the corrosive action of acids.
Polyimide is a kind of materials with high performances for their excellent thermal stability, dimensional stability, radiation resistance, mechanical properties, and electric properties, and is mainly used in the aerospace and electronic industries in the form of films and moldings [27-33], However, polyimide is generally insoluble and infusible, and this makes it difficult to process.
In fact, many natural polymers such as carbohydrates are infusible, lack thermal stability, and exhibit rather narrow molar mass distribution, thus impairing polymer melt-processing.
For the infusible form, loading doses are given on weeks 0, 2, and 4 followed by monthly dosing.
The full-service health care company specializes in providing high-margin specialty drugs such as biotech infusible, injectible and advanced oral medications to patients with chronic health conditions such as hemophilia, primary immune deficiencies (IVIG) and growth hormone deficiencies.
even if they get them to their doughnut hole," or coverage gap, "and bring them into the office for an infusible under Part B," Ms.
2003, said he will become president and director of research and development of a new company that is developing infusible and other platelet products.
The molecules in thermoplastics are easily separable and maintain mobility, but the molecules in thermosetting polymers undergo chemical reactions on heating that result in infusible, insoluble networks.
Several different forms of platelet substitute are now under development: infusible platelet membranes (IPM), thrombospheres, and lyophilized human platelets.
In this process the links between the chains are chemical bonds and once formed, are permanent - thus the products are insoluble and infusible.
By partnering with patients, physicians, healthcare payors, government agencies and pharmaceutical manufacturers we are able to provide access to infusible medications and management solutions.