ingress


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Related to ingress: Ingress protection

in·gress

 (ĭn′grĕs′)
n.
1. also in·gres·sion (ĭn-grĕsh′ən) A going in or entering.
2. Right or permission to enter.
3. A means or place of entering.

[Middle English ingresse, from Latin ingressus, from past participle of ingredī, to enter : in-, in; see in-2 + gradī, to step; see ghredh- in Indo-European roots.]

ingress

(ˈɪŋɡrɛs)
n
1. the act of going or coming in; an entering
2. a way in; entrance
3. the right or permission to enter
4. (Astronomy) astronomy another name for immersion2
[C15: from Latin ingressus, from ingredī to go in, from gradī to step, go]
ingression n

in•gress

(ˈɪn grɛs)

n.
1. the act of going in or entering.
2. the right to enter.
3. a means or place of entering.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin ingressus a going in, commencing]
in•gres•sion (ɪnˈgrɛʃ ən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ingress - (astronomy) the disappearance of a celestial body prior to an eclipse
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
disappearance - the event of passing out of sight
eclipse, occultation - one celestial body obscures another
egress, emersion - (astronomy) the reappearance of a celestial body after an eclipse
2.ingress - the act of entering; "she made a grand entrance"
arrival - the act of arriving at a certain place; "they awaited her arrival"
incursion - the act of entering some territory or domain (often in large numbers); "the incursion of television into the American living room"
intrusion - entrance by force or without permission or welcome
irruption - a sudden violent entrance; a bursting in; "the recent irruption of bad manners"
entree - the act of entering; "she made a graceful entree into the ballroom"
enrollment, enrolment, registration - the act of enrolling
penetration - the act of entering into or through something; "the penetration of upper management by women"
admission, admittance - the act of admitting someone to enter; "the surgery was performed on his second admission to the clinic"

ingress

noun
1. entry, admission, intrusion, leakage, seepage, inundation, inrush The wood may have been weakened by the ingress of water.
2. entrance, access, entry, door, admission, entrée, admittance, right of entry A lorry was blocking the ingress.

ingress

noun
1. The act of entering:
2. The right to enter or make use of:
3. The state of being allowed entry:
Translations

ingress

[ˈɪngres] N (frm) → acceso m

ingress

n (form)Zutritt m, → Eintritt m; no right of ingressZutritt verboten; to have free ingressRecht auf freien Zugang haben
References in classic literature ?
Looking about him while in this state of suspense, Charles Darnay observed that the gate was held by a mixed guard of soldiers and patriots, the latter far outnumbering the former; and that while ingress into the city for peasants' carts bringing in supplies, and for similar traffic and traffickers, was easy enough, egress, even for the homeliest people, was very difficult.
Free ingress had thus been afforded to two stray ponies, a goat, and a tramp, who lay asleep in the grass.
He passed between the scene behind which I stood and a set piece, went to the wall and pressed on a spring that moved a stone and afforded him an ingress.
Every red Martian is taught during earliest childhood the principles of the manufacture of atmosphere, but only two at one time ever hold the secret of ingress to the great building, which, built as it is with walls a hundred and fifty feet thick, is absolutely unassailable, even the roof being guarded from assault by air craft by a glass covering five feet thick.
A small door, close to the lodge of the concierge, gave ingress and egress to the servants and masters when they were on foot.
As the Indians had represented, they were now in a natural fastness of the mountains, the ingress and egress of which was by a deep gorge, so narrow, rugged, and difficult as to prevent secret approach or rapid retreat, and to admit of easy defence.
You will see," he said, "that I have shifted the question from the mode of egress to that of ingress.
The door had just opened to give ingress to a gentleman who stepped forward and whose face Newman remembered.
They resolved to leave means neither of ingress nor egress to the sudden impulses of despair or of frenzy from within.
My fingers clawed futilely at the unyielding portal, while my eyes sought in vain for a duplicate of the button which had given us ingress.
Slowly I circled the great shaft, looking for a means of ingress.
Again, for miles along the shores, handsome country seats, surrounded by gardens and groves, sit fairly in the water, sometimes in nooks carved by Nature out of the vine-hung precipices, and with no ingress or egress save by boats.