ingression


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in·gress

 (ĭn′grĕs′)
n.
1. also in·gres·sion (ĭn-grĕsh′ən) A going in or entering.
2. Right or permission to enter.
3. A means or place of entering.

[Middle English ingresse, from Latin ingressus, from past participle of ingredī, to enter : in-, in; see in-2 + gradī, to step; see ghredh- in Indo-European roots.]
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ingression

noun
The state of being allowed entry:
References in periodicals archive ?
There is currently water ingression into the building that has recently been internally refurbished.
This causes formaldehyde ingression into the atmosphere and further pollution of the air (Bagheri et al.
Focus areas include environmental degradation of high-temperature polymer and ceramic matrix composites subjected to thermal oxidation, thermal fatigue, moisture ingression, physics-based life prediction capabilities, modeling of concrete failure under blast and fragment loading, 3D nondestructive imaging techniques for mesoscale damage analysis of composite materials, and mechanical loading.
At this moment there is a challenging issue related with the ingression of underground water to the main buildings and this issue is producing a huge amount of contaminated water.
6), a painting that produces an almost stereoscopic ingression of human beings standing in front of you, with an additional sense of their physical mass.
The meters have a high level of ingression protection, with a rating of IP67, and a wide operational temperature range of -25 degrees Celsius to +55 degrees Celsius with remote and local operation of the valve as required in the AEEGSI mandate.
Additionally all cement plaster, currently causing serious damage due to the ingression of humidity and salinity, has to be removed up to a certain height.
A limited Pliocene marine ingression followed, which quickly turned into continental facies inter-fingering with basalts in the Tripoli-Hums area and parts of coastal Syria.
He said the far-reaching costs of metal theft at properties include additional labor costs to repair collateral damage; water damage stemming from stolen copper pipes; increased costs to ensure the damaged building and its services comply with updated regulations, which might not have applied during initial construction or installation; and lead removal from a property's exterior, possibly causing water ingression or triggering the need for regular and comprehensive inspections.
As the level of modification is increased, the availability of unsaturated group for cross-linking increases; subsequently, the three-dimensional networks prevent the rearrangement of the polymer chains during solvent ingression, thereby causing resistance to the path of penetrants (23), (24).
This last feature, in defiance of the law of heat naturally going up, is designed to prevent dust ingression and its blocking of heat emission.
The seeds were then wrapped in aluminum foil and placed in a plastic envelope, allowing no ingression of water, and kept in a water bath at 40[degrees]C for 48h.