ingurgitate

(redirected from ingurgitated)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

in·gur·gi·tate

 (ĭn-gûr′jĭ-tāt′)
tr.v. in·gur·gi·tat·ed, in·gur·gi·tat·ing, in·gur·gi·tates
To swallow greedily or in excessive amounts; gulp.

[Latin ingurgitāre, ingurgitāt- : in-, in; see in-2 + gurges, gurgit-, throat, whirlpool.]

in·gur′gi·ta′tion n.

ingurgitate

(ɪnˈɡɜːdʒɪˌteɪt)
vb
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) to swallow (food) with greed or in excess; gorge
[C16: from Latin ingurgitāre to flood, from in-2 + gurges abyss]
inˌgurgiˈtation n

in•gur•gi•tate

(ɪnˈgɜr dʒɪˌteɪt)

v. -tat•ed, -tat•ing. v.t.
1. to swallow greedily or in great quantity, as food.
2. to engulf; swallow up.
v.i.
3. to drink or eat greedily; guzzle; swill.
[1560–70; < Latin ingurgitāre to fill, flood, drench with a stream of liquid]
in•gur`gi•ta′tion, n.

ingurgitate


Past participle: ingurgitated
Gerund: ingurgitating

Imperative
ingurgitate
ingurgitate
Present
I ingurgitate
you ingurgitate
he/she/it ingurgitates
we ingurgitate
you ingurgitate
they ingurgitate
Preterite
I ingurgitated
you ingurgitated
he/she/it ingurgitated
we ingurgitated
you ingurgitated
they ingurgitated
Present Continuous
I am ingurgitating
you are ingurgitating
he/she/it is ingurgitating
we are ingurgitating
you are ingurgitating
they are ingurgitating
Present Perfect
I have ingurgitated
you have ingurgitated
he/she/it has ingurgitated
we have ingurgitated
you have ingurgitated
they have ingurgitated
Past Continuous
I was ingurgitating
you were ingurgitating
he/she/it was ingurgitating
we were ingurgitating
you were ingurgitating
they were ingurgitating
Past Perfect
I had ingurgitated
you had ingurgitated
he/she/it had ingurgitated
we had ingurgitated
you had ingurgitated
they had ingurgitated
Future
I will ingurgitate
you will ingurgitate
he/she/it will ingurgitate
we will ingurgitate
you will ingurgitate
they will ingurgitate
Future Perfect
I will have ingurgitated
you will have ingurgitated
he/she/it will have ingurgitated
we will have ingurgitated
you will have ingurgitated
they will have ingurgitated
Future Continuous
I will be ingurgitating
you will be ingurgitating
he/she/it will be ingurgitating
we will be ingurgitating
you will be ingurgitating
they will be ingurgitating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ingurgitating
you have been ingurgitating
he/she/it has been ingurgitating
we have been ingurgitating
you have been ingurgitating
they have been ingurgitating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ingurgitating
you will have been ingurgitating
he/she/it will have been ingurgitating
we will have been ingurgitating
you will have been ingurgitating
they will have been ingurgitating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ingurgitating
you had been ingurgitating
he/she/it had been ingurgitating
we had been ingurgitating
you had been ingurgitating
they had been ingurgitating
Conditional
I would ingurgitate
you would ingurgitate
he/she/it would ingurgitate
we would ingurgitate
you would ingurgitate
they would ingurgitate
Past Conditional
I would have ingurgitated
you would have ingurgitated
he/she/it would have ingurgitated
we would have ingurgitated
you would have ingurgitated
they would have ingurgitated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.ingurgitate - overeat or eat immodestlyingurgitate - overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself; "She stuffed herself at the dinner"; "The kids binged on ice cream"
eat - eat a meal; take a meal; "We did not eat until 10 P.M. because there were so many phone calls"; "I didn't eat yet, so I gladly accept your invitation"

ingurgitate

verb
To swallow (food or drink) greedily or rapidly in large amounts:
References in classic literature ?
At his decease, there is only a vacancy, and a momentary eddy,--very small, as compared with the apparent magnitude of the ingurgitated object,--and a bubble or two, ascending out of the black depth and bursting at the surface.
I produce an inventory--a genre peculiar to stately homes, probate settlements, and experimental fiction--such as that of the late French writer Georges Perec, whose "Attempt at an Inventory of all the Substances ingurgitated by me in 1974" asks what we can learn by the simple recording of everyday detail, what he called L'Infraordinaire.