inhabited


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in·hab·it·ed

 (ĭn-hăb′ĭ-tĭd)
adj.
Having inhabitants; lived in: a sparsely inhabited plain.

inhabited

(ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd)
adj
lived in

in•hab•it•ed

(ɪnˈhæb ɪ tɪd)

adj.
having inhabitants.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inhabited - having inhabitants; lived in; "the inhabited regions of the earth"
uninhabited - not having inhabitants; not lived in; "an uninhabited island"; "gaping doors of uninhabited houses"

inhabited

adjective populated, peopled, occupied, held, developed, settled, tenanted, colonized a land primarily inhabited by nomads
Translations
naseljen

inhabited

[ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] ADJhabitado

inhabited

[ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] adj [country, island, region] → habité(e); [house] → habité(e)
a sparsely inhabited region → une région faiblement peuplée

inhabited

[ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] adjabitato/a
References in classic literature ?
His room began to be inhabited by the spirits of men and women among whom he went, in his turn saying words.
Even your traditions make the case in my favor, Chingachgook," he said, speaking in the tongue which was known to all the natives who formerly inhabited the country between the Hudson and the Potomac, and of which we shall give a free translation for the benefit of the reader; endeavoring, at the same time, to preserve some of the peculiarities, both of the individual and of the language.
Thus we behold Kentucke, lately an howling wilderness, the habitation of savages and wild beasts, become a fruitful field; this region, so favourably distinguished by nature, now become the habitation of civilization, at a period unparalleled in history, in the midst of a raging war, and under all the disadvantages of emigration to a country so remote from the inhabited parts of the continent.
Every gesture, every word, and even the silence of those with whom she came in contact, implied, and often expressed, that she was banished, and as much alone as if she inhabited another sphere, or communicated with the common nature by other organs and senses than the rest of human kind.
But as my little conductress, with her hair of gold and her frock of blue, danced before me round corners and pattered down passages, I had the view of a castle of romance inhabited by a rosy sprite, such a place as would somehow, for diversion of the young idea, take all color out of storybooks and fairytales.
The opulent family that had inhabited the house in the days of its splendor had imported a great deal of splendid furniture, some of which they had taken away with them, while some remained standing desolate in mouldering, unoccupied rooms, or stored away in this place.
The place was in fine order, and was inhabited by a family of princely rank.
He was on the inhabited side of Wilson's house, and now as he approached it, he noticed that the sitting room was lighted.
A room at an inn was always damp and dangerous; never properly aired, or fit to be inhabited.
Clare the elder inhabited an unpretending little cottage, situated just outside the shrubbery fence which marked the limit of the Combe-Raven grounds.
It opened from a stinking little black courtyard, and was the general public entrance to a great pile of houses, inhabited by a great number of people.
Crupp, on an abstract question (the propriety of chambers being inhabited by the gentler sex); and my aunt, utterly indifferent to spasms on the part of Mrs.