inhalator

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in·ha·la·tor

 (ĭn′hə-lā′tər)
n.

inhalator

(ˈɪnhəˌleɪtə)
n
(Medicine) another name for nebulizer

in•ha•la•tor

(ˈɪn həˌleɪ tər)

n.
1. an apparatus used to help inhale air, anesthetics, medicinal vapors, etc.
2. an apparatus for giving artificial respiration; respirator.
[1925–30, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inhalator - a breathing device for administering long-term artificial respirationinhalator - a breathing device for administering long-term artificial respiration
breathing apparatus, breathing device, breathing machine, ventilator - a device that facilitates breathing in cases of respiratory failure
iron lung - respirator that produces alternations in air pressure in a chamber surrounding a patient's chest to force air into and out of the lungs thus providing artificial respiration
mouthpiece - a part that goes over or into the mouth of a person; "the mouthpiece of a respirator"
2.inhalator - a dispenser that produces a chemical vapor to be inhaled in order to relieve nasal congestioninhalator - a dispenser that produces a chemical vapor to be inhaled in order to relieve nasal congestion
dispenser - a container so designed that the contents can be used in prescribed amounts
Translations

inhalator

[ˈɪnhəleɪtəʳ] Ninhalador m

inhalator

References in periodicals archive ?
This is available in a range of forms such as patches and inhalators, which all work at slightly different speeds.
II-68 New Developments in Ventilator Monitoring II-68 Inhalators.
Your pharmacist will talk you through the different nicotine replacement therapies available to help you give up, such as patches, gums, lozenges, micro-tabs, nasal sprays and inhalators.
Carol Carter, clinical lead nurse for Birmingham Stop Smoking Service, said: "We offer a range of types of NRT, including chewing gum, patches, lozenges and inhalators.
Most smokers take several attempts to quit for good but you can increase your chances of succeeding by using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), such as nicotine patches, gum, inhalators, nasal sprays, lozenges and prescriptiononly medicines.
They may suggest a form of nicotine replacement therapy such as skin patches, inhalators, chewing gum or sprays.
Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) can really help people quit through patches, chewing gum, microtabs, lozenges, inhalators and nasal sprays.
This medication, when used with inhalators, has been shown to reduce 'lung attacks' and improve lung function especially in severe cases," Dr Mahboub concluded.
She said: "I tried to use the patches and the inhalators but they didn't work.
Nicotine-containing inhalators are also widely available.