inhere

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in·here

 (ĭn-hîr′)
intr.v. in·hered, in·her·ing, in·heres
To be inherent or innate.

[Latin inhaerēre : in-, in; see in-2 + haerēre, to stick.]

in·her′ence (-hîr′əns, -hĕr′-), in·her′en·cy n.

inhere

(ɪnˈhɪə)
vb
(foll by: in) to be an inseparable part (of)
[C16: from Latin inhaerēre to stick in, from haerēre to stick]

in•here

(ɪnˈhɪər)

v.i. -hered, -her•ing.
to be inherent.
[1580–90; < Latin inhaerēre to remain attached =in- in-2 + haerēre to stick]

inhere


Past participle: inhered
Gerund: inhering

Imperative
inhere
inhere
Present
I inhere
you inhere
he/she/it inheres
we inhere
you inhere
they inhere
Preterite
I inhered
you inhered
he/she/it inhered
we inhered
you inhered
they inhered
Present Continuous
I am inhering
you are inhering
he/she/it is inhering
we are inhering
you are inhering
they are inhering
Present Perfect
I have inhered
you have inhered
he/she/it has inhered
we have inhered
you have inhered
they have inhered
Past Continuous
I was inhering
you were inhering
he/she/it was inhering
we were inhering
you were inhering
they were inhering
Past Perfect
I had inhered
you had inhered
he/she/it had inhered
we had inhered
you had inhered
they had inhered
Future
I will inhere
you will inhere
he/she/it will inhere
we will inhere
you will inhere
they will inhere
Future Perfect
I will have inhered
you will have inhered
he/she/it will have inhered
we will have inhered
you will have inhered
they will have inhered
Future Continuous
I will be inhering
you will be inhering
he/she/it will be inhering
we will be inhering
you will be inhering
they will be inhering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been inhering
you have been inhering
he/she/it has been inhering
we have been inhering
you have been inhering
they have been inhering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been inhering
you will have been inhering
he/she/it will have been inhering
we will have been inhering
you will have been inhering
they will have been inhering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been inhering
you had been inhering
he/she/it had been inhering
we had been inhering
you had been inhering
they had been inhering
Conditional
I would inhere
you would inhere
he/she/it would inhere
we would inhere
you would inhere
they would inhere
Past Conditional
I would have inhered
you would have inhered
he/she/it would have inhered
we would have inhered
you would have inhered
they would have inhered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.inhere - be inherent in something
belong to, belong - be a part or adjunct; "the uniform looks like it belonged to a museum collection"; "These pages don't belong"

inhere

verb
To have an inherent basis:
Translations

inhere

[ɪnˈhɪəʳ] VI (frm) → ser inherente (in a)

inhere

vi to inhere in somethingeiner Sache (dat)innewohnen
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The current court - all of whose members, I hasten to add, are my friends in whose fairness, intelligence and freedom from bias I have complete confidence - has, nonetheless, shown a conspicuous willingness to overrule precedent, particularly when doing so is, in their eyes, compelled by "original intent" and "plain text" - both of which could excuse rolling back the protections against invidious discrimination that for decades have inhered in Article I, Section 20.
The Minister also talked about the contemporary challenges faced by government like complex and inhered energy crisis and reduction in external financing.
Virtue, wisdom, honour, and, above all, the truth inhered to Western philosophy before the discipline changed for the worse.
This slipperiness inhered, too, in the exhibition's title--an homage to Barnett Newman's painting Who's Afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue?
Carol Richardson, for instance, in her "Constructing Space in Renaissance Painting," makes the case that single-point perspective has been "over-privileged" in most accounts of the period, while Tim Benton argues in "Architecture: Theory and Practice" that medieval architectural principles inhered in the work of even the most progressive Renaissance architects.
Indeed, Joyce argues that liberal rule inhered in and worked through the very material fabric of the city.
Even though so many confessed to knowing very little about genetics, they clearly felt some value inhered in understanding their own and their loved ones' genetic profiles.
Yet one wonders whether this variety supports or undermines the author's thesis that one impulse has inhered in West Indian Christianity.