inherent


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in·her·ent

 (ĭn-hîr′ənt, -hĕr′-)
adj.
Existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; intrinsic: the dangers inherent in the surgery; the inherent instability of financial markets.

[Latin inhaerēns, inhaerent-, present participle of inhaerēre, to inhere; see inhere.]

in·her′ent·ly adv.

inherent

(ɪnˈhɪərənt; -ˈhɛr-)
adj
existing as an inseparable part; intrinsic
inˈherently adv

in•her•ent

(ɪnˈhɪər ənt, -ˈhɛr-)

adj.
existing in someone or something as a permanent and inseparable element, quality, or attribute; innate.
[1570–80; < Latin]
in•her′ent•ly, adv.
syn: See essential.

inherent

  • imminent, immanent - Imminent is "about to happen" and immanent is "inherent" or "pervading the material world."
  • intrinsic - Latin intrinsecus, "on the inside," came to be the English intrinsic, "inner, internal" and "inherent."
  • proper - First meant "inherent, intrinsic."
  • innate, inherent - The word innate means "inborn" and should apply to living things; inherent is "essential, intrinsic" and applies best to nonliving things like ideas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inherent - existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; "the Ptolemaic system with its built-in concept of periodicity"; "a constitutional inability to tell the truth"
intrinsic, intrinsical - belonging to a thing by its very nature; "form was treated as something intrinsic, as the very essence of the thing"- John Dewey
2.inherent - in the nature of something though not readily apparent; "shortcomings inherent in our approach"; "an underlying meaning"
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"

inherent

inherent

adjective
Forming an essential element, as arising from the basic structure of an individual:
Translations
مُلازِم، مُتأصِّل، فِطْري
podstatnývlastnízákladní
iboende
benne rejlõ
prigimtinis
iedzimtsraksturigs
neoddeliteľný
doğuştanyapısında var olan

inherent

[ɪnˈhɪərənt] ADJinherente, intrínseco
to be inherent in or to sthser inherente a algo
with all the inherent difficultiescon todas las dificultades que conlleva

inherent

[ɪnˈhɛrənt] adj [quality] → intrinsèque
He acknowledged the firm did have inherent problems which needed to be resolved → Il a admis l'existence de problèmes inhérents à la compagnie requérant d'être résolus.
socialism's inherent weaknesses → les faiblesses inhérentes au socialisme
the inherent risks in multiple births → les risques inhérents aux naissances multiples
to be an inherent part of sth → faire partie intégrante de qch
to be inherent in sth, to be inherent to sth [dangers, risks, problems] → être inhérent(e) à qch

inherent

adjinnewohnend, eigen, inhärent (esp Philos) (→ to, in +dat); the inherent hardness of diamondsdie den Diamanten eigene Härte; instincts inherent in all animalsallen Tieren inhärente or eigene Instinkte

inherent

[ɪnˈhɪərnt] adj inherent (in)intrinseco/a (a); (kindness, cruelty) → innato/a (a)

inherent

(inˈhiərənt) adjective
inborn; forming a natural or inseparable part or quality of. the dangers inherent in nuclear energy; an inherent hatred of foreigners.
inˈherently adverb
basically. He may be mischievous, but he is not inherently wicked.

in·her·ent

a. inherente, rel. a una cualidad natural o innata.
References in classic literature ?
The family of Colonel Pyncheon, at the epoch of his death, seemed destined to as fortunate a permanence as can anywise consist with the inherent instability of human affairs.
But in the great Sperm Whale, this high and mighty god-like dignity inherent in the brow is so immensely amplified, that gazing on it, in that full front view, you feel the Deity and the dread powers more forcibly than in beholding any other object in living nature.
She thought she would take time to think of it; and, by the way of gaining time, and in hopes of some indefinite moral virtues supposed to be inherent in dark closets, Miss Ophelia shut Topsy up in one till she had arranged her ideas further on the subject.
The character inherent in the American people has done all that has been accomplished; and it would have done somewhat more, if the government had not sometimes got in its way.
I was from Con- necticut, whose Constitution declares "that all political power is inherent in the people, and all free govern- ments are founded on their authority and instituted for their benefit; and that they have AT ALL TIMES an undeni- able and indefeasible right to ALTER THEIR FORM OF GOVERN- MENT in such a manner as they may think expedient.
It has indeed happened, that governments of this kind have generally operated in the manner which the distinction taken notice of, supposes to be inherent in their nature; but there have been in most of them extensive exceptions to the practice, which serve to prove, as far as example will go, that there is no absolute rule on the subject.
With equal readiness will it be perceived, that besides these inducements to candor, many allowances ought to be made for the difficulties inherent in the very nature of the undertaking referred to the convention.
And thus, as a closer and still closer intimacy admitted me more unreservedly into the recesses of his spirit, the more bitterly did I perceive the futility of all attempt at cheering a mind from which darkness, as if an inherent positive quality, poured forth upon all objects of the moral and physical universe, in one unceasing radiation of gloom.
This ray, like the ninth ray, is unknown on Earth, but the Martians have discovered that it is an inherent property of all light no matter from what source it emanates.
He told him of all those things that seem most horrible to the creature of civilization in the hope that the knowledge of them might expunge from the lad's mind any inherent desire for the jungle.
In our growing science of hypnotism we find the promise of a possibility of superseding old inherent instincts by new suggestions, grafting upon or replacing the inherited fixed ideas.
through want of capacity, the error is inherent in the poetry.