inheritor

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in·her·it

 (ĭn-hĕr′ĭt)
v. in·her·it·ed, in·her·it·ing, in·her·its
v.tr.
1. Law
a. To take (property) by law of descent from an intestate owner.
b. To receive (property) by will; receive by bequest or devise.
2. To receive or take over from a predecessor: The new administration inherited the economic problems of the last four years.
3. Biology To receive (a characteristic) from a parent or ancestor by genetic transmission.
4. To gain (something) as one's right or portion: "A certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" (King James Bible).
v.intr.
To hold or take possession of an inheritance.

[Middle English enheriten, from Old French enheriter, to make heir to, from Late Latin inhērēditāre, to inherit : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Late Latin hērēditāre, to inherit (from Latin hērēs, hērēd-, heir; see ghē- in Indo-European roots).]

in·her′i·tor n.

in•her•i•tor

(ɪnˈhɛr ɪ tər)

n.
a person who inherits; heir.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inheritor - a person who is entitled by law or by the terms of a will to inherit the estate of another
recipient, receiver - a person who receives something
heir apparent - an heir whose right to an inheritance cannot be defeated if that person outlives the ancestor
heir-at-law - the person legally entitled to inherit the property of someone who dies intestate
heiress, inheritress, inheritrix - a female heir
heir presumptive - a person who expects to inherit but whose right can be defeated by the birth of a nearer relative

inheritor

noun heir, successor, recipient, beneficiary, legatee Two thirds of inheritors promptly sold the houses they were left.
Translations

inheritor

[ɪnˈherɪtəʳ] Nheredero/a m/f

inheritor

[ɪnˈhɛrɪtər] n
[tradition] → héritier/ière m/f
the proud inheritors of the Prussian military tradition → les fiers héritiers de la tradition militaire prussienne
[money, property] → héritier/ière m/f

inheritor

[ɪnˈhɛrɪtəʳ] nerede m/f
References in classic literature ?
But the stricken old grandmother trembled to think that these too were the inheritors of their father's shame as well as of his honours, and watched sickening for the day when the awful ancestral curse should come down on them.
The children of the two dead brothers -- inheritors of the implacable enmity which had parted their parents -- were Man and Wife.
And the inheritors, being remote, would not be likely to abandon their just rights, for sentimental reasons regarding an entire stranger.
Tashtego's long, lean, sable hair, his high cheek bones, and black rounding eyes --for an Indian, Oriental in their largeness, but Antarctic in their glittering expression --all this sufficiently proclaimed him an inheritor of the unvitiated blood of those proud warrior hunters, who, in quest of the great New England moose, had scoured, bow in hand, the aboriginal forests of the main.
Henry Dashwood, the legal inheritor of the Norland estate, and the person to whom he intended to bequeath it.
This man's grandfather, also named Edgar--they keep the tradition of the family Christian name--quarrelled with his family and went to live abroad, not keeping up any intercourse, good or bad, with his relatives, although this particular Edgar, as I told you, did visit his family estate, yet his son was born and lived and died abroad, while his grandson, the latest inheritor, was also born and lived abroad till he was over thirty--his present age.
That you become the sole inheritor of the wealth of this rich old hunks, that you and I spend it together, and that you get into the bargain a beautiful young wife.
The old man's declaration that Valentine was not the destined inheritor of his fortune had excited the hopes of Madame de Villefort; she gradually approached the invalid, and said: "Then, doubtless, dear M.
Such was Sir Patrick Lundie; brother of the late baronet, Sir Thomas; and inheritor, at Sir Thomas's death, of the title and estates.
Can I separate my father's twin-brother, joint inheritor, and next successor, from himself?
Inheritor of a handsome fortune made by his father and his grandfather in trade.
He was an officer of the crown, and had been induced to remove from the Floridas, among the French of the adjoining province, by a rich succession of which he had become the inheritor.