injury

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in·ju·ry

 (ĭn′jə-rē)
n. pl. in·ju·ries
1. Damage or harm done to or suffered by a person or thing: escaped from the accident without injury; a scandal that did considerable injury to the campaign.
2. A particular form of hurt, damage, or loss: a leg injury.
3. Law Violation of the rights of another party for which legal redress is available.
4. Obsolete An insult.

[Middle English injurie, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin iniūria, a wrong, injustice, from feminine of iniūrius, unjust : in-, not; see in-1 + iūs, iūr-, law; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

injury

(ˈɪndʒərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. physical damage or hurt
2. a specific instance of this: a leg injury.
3. harm done to a reputation
4. (Law) law a violation or infringement of another person's rights that causes him harm and is actionable at law
5. an obsolete word for insult
[C14: from Latin injūria injustice, wrong, from injūriōsus acting unfairly, wrongful, from in-1 + jūs right]

in•ju•ry

(ˈɪn dʒə ri)

n., pl. -ju•ries.
1. harm or damage done or sustained, esp. bodily harm: to escape without injury.
2. a particular form or instance of harm: an injury to one's shoulder; an injury to one's pride.
3. wrong or injustice done or suffered.
4. Law. any violation of the rights, property, etc., of another for which damages may be sought.
5. Obs. injurious speech; calumny.
[1350–1400; Middle English injurie < Latin injūria unlawful conduct =in- in-3 + jūr-, s. of jūs right, law]

injury

A term comprising such conditions as fractures, wounds, sprains, strains, dislocations, concussions, and compressions. In addition, it includes conditions resulting from extremes of temperature or prolonged exposure. Acute poisonings (except those due to contaminated food) resulting from exposure to a toxic or poisonous substance are also classed as injuries. See also casualty; wounded.

Injury

See also pain.

the process or act of pelting with stones, sometimes as a form of execution.
Anglo-Saxon Law. payment for an injury, calculated at eight times its real or estimated value.
1. any abnormal condition, either pathological or psychological, caused by wound or injury, either physical or psychological.
2. the trauma, wound, or injury itself. — traumatic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.injury - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.injury - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
health problem, ill health, unhealthiness - a state in which you are unable to function normally and without pain
brain damage - injury to the brain that impairs its functions (especially permanently); can be caused by trauma to the head, infection, hemorrhage, inadequate oxygen, genetic abnormality, etc.
birth trauma - physical injury to an infant during the birth process
blast trauma - injury caused the explosion of a bomb (especially in enclosed spaces)
bleeding, haemorrhage, hemorrhage - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vessel
blunt trauma - injury incurred when the human body hits or is hit by a large outside object (as a car)
bruise, contusion - an injury that doesn't break the skin but results in some discoloration
bump - a lump on the body caused by a blow
burn - an injury caused by exposure to heat or chemicals or radiation
dislocation - a displacement of a part (especially a bone) from its normal position (as in the shoulder or the vertebral column)
electric shock - trauma caused by the passage of electric current through the body (as from contact with high voltage lines or being struck by lightning); usually involves burns and abnormal heart rhythm and unconsciousness
fracture, break - breaking of hard tissue such as bone; "it was a nasty fracture"; "the break seems to have been caused by a fall"
cryopathy, frostbite - destruction of tissue by freezing and characterized by tingling, blistering and possibly gangrene
intravasation - entry of foreign matter into a blood vessel
penetrating injury, penetrating trauma - injury incurred when an object (as a knife or bullet or shrapnel) penetrates into the body
pinch - an injury resulting from getting some body part squeezed
rupture - state of being torn or burst open
insect bite, sting, bite - a painful wound caused by the thrust of an insect's stinger into skin
strain - injury to a muscle (often caused by overuse); results in swelling and pain
whiplash, whiplash injury - an injury to the neck (the cervical vertebrae) resulting from rapid acceleration or deceleration (as in an automobile accident)
wale, weal, welt, wheal - a raised mark on the skin (as produced by the blow of a whip); characteristic of many allergic reactions
wound, lesion - an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin)
wrench, pull, twist - a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments; "the wrench to his knee occurred as he fell"; "he was sidelined with a hamstring pull"
2.injury - an accident that results in physical damage or hurtinjury - an accident that results in physical damage or hurt
accident - an unfortunate mishap; especially one causing damage or injury
concussion - injury to the brain caused by a blow; usually resulting in loss of consciousness
mutilation - an injury that causes disfigurement or that deprives you of a limb or other important body part
3.injury - a casualty to military personnel resulting from combat
blighty wound - a wound that would cause an English soldier to be sent home from service abroad
flesh wound - a wound that does not damage important internal organs or shatter any bones
personnel casualty, loss - military personnel lost by death or capture
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
4.injury - an act that causes someone or something to receive physical damage
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
disservice, ill service, ill turn - an act intended to help that turns out badly; "he did them a disservice"
spoil, spoiling, spoilage - the act of spoiling something by causing damage to it; "her spoiling my dress was deliberate"
5.injury - wrongdoing that violates another's rights and is unjustly inflicted
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
legal injury, wrong, damage - any harm or injury resulting from a violation of a legal right

injury

noun
1. wound, cut, damage, slash, trauma (Pathology), sore, gash, lesion, abrasion, laceration Four police officers sustained serious injuries in the explosion.
2. harm, suffering, damage, ill, hurt, disability, misfortune, affliction, impairment, disfigurement The two other passengers escaped serious injury.
3. wrong, abuse, offence, insult, injustice, grievance, affront, detriment, disservice She was awarded £3,500 for injury to her feelings.

injury

noun
1. The action or result of inflicting loss or pain:
2. Law. An act that is not just:
Translations
إِصَابَةٌأضْرار
zraněnípoškození
skadesår
vundo
آسیب
vamma
ozljedapovrjedarana
sérüléshátránykárosodás
cederaluka
meiîsli, áverkisár
怪我
부상
urážka
poškodba
skada
afa
ความบาดเจ็บ
vết thương

injury

[ˈɪndʒəri] n
(physical)blessure f
to sustain injuries → être victime de blessures
to sustain serious injuries → être sérieusement blessé(e)
She sustained serious injuries in the explosion → Elle a été sérieusement blessée lors de l'explosion.
to suffer injuries to one's face → souffrir de blessures au visage
to escape without injury → s'en sortir sain et sauf
to do o.s. an injury → se blesser
Careful! You'll do yourself an injury → Attention ! Tu vas te blesser. injury time
(= wrong) → tort minjury list n (SPORT)liste f des blessésinjury-prone [ˈɪndʒəriprəʊn] adjsujet(te) aux blessuresinjury time n (British)arrêts mpl de jeu

injury

nVerletzung f (→ to +gen); (fig also)Kränkung f (→ to +gen); to do somebody/oneself an injuryjdn/sich verletzen; to play injury time (Brit Sport) or injury overtime (US Sport) → nachspielen, Nachspielzeit haben; they are into injury time (Brit Sport) or injury overtime (US Sport) → das ist Nachspielzeit; injury benefit (Brit) → Unfall- or Krankengeld nt

injury

[ˈɪndʒrɪ] n (physical) → ferita, lesione f (fig) (to reputation) → danno; (to feelings) → offesa; (wrong) → torto
to escape without injury → rimanere illeso/a

injure

(ˈindʒə) verb
to harm or damage. He injured his arm when he fell; They were badly injured when the car crashed; A story like that could injure his reputation; His pride has been injured.
ˈinjured adjective
1. (also noun) (people who have been) wounded or harmed. The injured (people) were all taken to hospital after the accident.
2. (of feelings, pride etc) hurt. `Why didn't you tell me before?' he said in an injured voice.
injurious (inˈdʒuəriəs) adjective
(with to) harmful. Smoking is injurious to one's health.
ˈinjuryplural ˈinjuries noun
(an instance of) harm or damage. Badly designed chairs can cause injury to the spine; The motorcyclist received severe injuries in the crash.

injury

إِصَابَةٌ zranění skade Verletzung τραύμα lesión vamma blessure ozljeda lesione 怪我 부상 verwonding skade rana ferimento травма skada ความบาดเจ็บ yara vết thương 伤害

in·ju·ry

n. lesión, lastimadura; herida;
degloving ___herida de avulsión;
___ -freeileso-a.

injury

n (pl -ries) herida, lesión f, traumatismo; spinal cord — lesión medular, lesión de la médula espinal; sports — lesión deportiva; traumatic brain — lesión cerebral traumática
References in classic literature ?
That plotter Waddington, or some of his tools, dropped a bomb where it might have done us some injury, but Professor Bumper, who was a fellow passenger, on his way to South America to look for the lost city of Pelone, calmly picked up the bomb, plucked out the fuse, and saved us from bad injuries, if not death.
Something like this I had heard before," said Cora, observing that he paused to suppress those passions which began to burn with too bright a flame, as he recalled the recollection of his supposed injuries.
He might possibly have sued the company, and got some damages for his injuries, but he did not know this, and it was not the company's business to tell him.
As a general thing -- as far as I could make out -- these murderous adventures were not forays undertaken to avenge injuries, nor to settle old disputes or sudden fallings out; no, as a rule they were simply duels be- tween strangers -- duels between people who had never even been introduced to each other, and between whom existed no cause of offense whatever.
At the end of five minutes from the beginning of the duel the surgeon stopped it; the challenging party had suffered such injuries that any addition to them might be dangerous.
She said, with a grim implacability in voice and manner which made Tom almost realize that even a former slave can remember for ten minutes insults and injuries returned for compliments and flatteries received, and can also enjoy taking revenge for them when the opportunity offers:
She was quick in feeling the little injuries to Isabella, which Isabella never felt herself.
Sir John had dropped hints of past injuries and disappointments, which justified her belief of his being an unfortunate man, and she regarded him with respect and compassion.
Earnshaw's death, which happened in less than two years after, the young master had learned to regard his father as an oppressor rather than a friend, and Heathcliff as a usurper of his parent's affections and his privileges; and he grew bitter with brooding over these injuries.
exclaimed Magdalen, chafing under a sense of her own injuries.
Encamped at a quarter before nine, in good time to touch his three- cornered hat to the oldest of men as they passed in to Tellson's, Jerry took up his station on this windy March morning, with young Jerry standing by him, when not engaged in making forays through the Bar, to inflict bodily and mental injuries of an acute description on passing boys who were small enough for his amiable purpose.
She was so unusually roused, that I was glad to compound for an affectionate hug, elicited by this revival in her mind of our old injuries, and to make the best I could of it, before Mr.