inmigrant

inmigrant

(ˈɪnˌmaɪɡrənt)
adj
coming in from another area of the same country: an inmigrant worker.
n
an inmigrant person or animal
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking back in 1944, CMHA would report: "Because the work was unpleasant, heavy, dirty, hot and with low wages, practically no one would take a foundry job except inmigrant Negroes.
Table 1 Comparison of Elderly Migrant Characteristics Selected Appalachian State Areas, 1980 Characteristic by Appalachian Appalachian Mover Type New York North Carolina Percentage Age 75+ Inmigrant 41.
The impact of this variety may best be illustrated using a scenario in which the number of retiree inmigrants to a community exceeds out migrants, with the outmigrants having more education and higher incomes than the inmigrants.
He continued: ``When the rural community is very attractive (as is the case in much of rural Wales), or close to large urban centres (also true in the case of much of Wales), in-migration can reach levels at which the culture of the inmigrant population completely displaces the culture of the indigenous population.
The filter mechanisms in urban housing markets guide inmigrants to precisely the neighbourhoods where they come across native Germans living in existentially precarious situations, and who for this reason are least able to embark on the adventure of dealing with strangers in resigned tolerance and urban virtuousness.
Cymuned has campaigned by giving out information packs on Wales and the Welsh language and culture to English inmigrants and offering lessons, as well agentsas picketing estate Last night, Mr Jones said: 'We welcome the fact that the DCC realises that moving so many people from England does have an impact and that it should be considered by home secretary Charles Clarke as part of the government's immigration policy.
They treat theWelsh like just another minority' AN EXTRACT FROM PARKER'S PLANET ARTICLE IT is a sad truth that many English inmigrants into rural Wales are out-and-out racists.
has a relatively high proportion of inmigrants, an outcome of a stronger economic base than Atlantic Canada as well as the social aspect of being a Canadian retirement haven.
The uniting of inmigrants with respect to provinces, and that of immigrants with respect to their status as refugee or pre-Independence population of the city, is thus the activation of larger ethnic identities which has common interest as its basis, as sanctioned by the local, regional, and national conditions and forces.
No mention is made of the indirect effects of migration on urban population growth: an "echo effect" resulting from the concentration of inmigrants in their prime childbearing years.
The age of Springfield's lowest groups corresponds well with the age Innes gives for laborers in Springfield, be they recent inmigrants or not.