innards


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in·nards

 (ĭn′ərdz)
pl.n. Informal
1. Internal bodily organs; viscera.
2. The inner parts, as of a machine.

[Alteration of inwards, pl. of inward.]

innards

(ˈɪnədz)
pl n
1. (Anatomy) the internal organs of the body, esp the viscera
2. (Mechanical Engineering) the interior parts or components of anything, esp the working parts
[C19: colloquial variant of inwards]

in•nards

(ˈɪn ərdz)

n.pl.
1. the internal parts of the body; entrails or viscera.
2. the internal mechanism, parts, structure, etc., of something: an engine's innards.
[1815–25; variant of inwards]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.innards - internal organs collectively (especially those in the abdominal cavity)innards - internal organs collectively (especially those in the abdominal cavity); "`viscera' is the plural form of `viscus'"
internal organ, viscus - a main organ that is situated inside the body

innards

plural noun
1. intestines, insides (informal), guts, entrails, viscera, vitals What happens to the innards of a carcass hung up for butchery?
2. works, mechanism, guts (informal) The innards of the PC are built into the desk.
Translations

innards

[ˈɪnədz] NPLtripas fpl

innards

[ˈɪnərdz] nplentrailles fpl

innards

plInnereien pl (also fig), → Eingeweide pl

innards

[ˈɪnədz] npl (fam) → budella fpl
References in classic literature ?
When she comes spluttering down, out go your innards.
You can do a non-edible version by using the pumpkin innards for the sick.
They not only plant a solid plug in your chamber, but they protect your firearm's innards from dust and debris too.
iPhone 6C, which could contain the iPhone 6's innards, but be available with a
and colleagues tweaked a technique to see cells' innards (SN Online: 10/8/14).
Eventually, Nilsen boiled the heads, hands and feet to remove the flesh, then chopped the innards into small pieces and flushed them down the toilet - which eventually blocked the drains.
But, truly, there are more important issues to worry about surrounding food, like what the added salt and sugars are doing to our heart and our waistlines, what the preservatives are doing to our innards and why, when there are people in this country relying on food banks to eat, we throw away vast quantities of the stuff every week.
The experiment takes place at the Science Museum in London, where a small pill camera offers a unique view of Michael's innards as they go about their daily task of digesting his food intake.
For instance, Keeping Up the Pureness, 2004, from the "Kusozu" (Nine Aspects of Decomposition) series, 2004-11, shows a naked woman lying in a field of flowers with her belly cut open to display her organs and the inside of her womb, but wearing a beatific smile, while Insane Woman Under the Cherry Tree, 2005, depicts a figure in a traditional kimono vomiting out her innards.
Indonesia: Indonesia suspended imports of boned meat and innards from US beef Thursday but boneless meat remained unaffected, authorities said, after a new case of mad cow disease in California.
Soules works for the website iFixit, which specialises in revealing the innards of Apple products and analysing them.
This design has much going for it, as it has the rifle's innards taking up the unused space in the stock, pushing the whole action further back, much closer to the shooter's shoulder.