innate


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in·nate

 (ĭ-nāt′, ĭn′āt′)
adj.
1.
a. Existing naturally or by heredity rather than being learned through experience: "Chimpanzees show an innate distrust of contact with strangers" (Cindy Engel).
b. Of or produced by the mind rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of right and wrong.
2. Possessed as an essential characteristic; inherent: "As the Army and farmers built more and more levees, the Missouri lost an innate capacity to absorb its frequent excesses" (William Least Heat-Moon).

[Middle English innat, from Latin innātus, past participle of innāscī, to be born in : in-, in; see in-2 + nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

in·nate′ly adv.
in·nate′ness n.

innate

(ɪˈneɪt; ˈɪneɪt)
adj
1. existing in a person or animal from birth; congenital; inborn
2. being an essential part of the character of a person or thing
3. instinctive; not learned: innate capacities.
4. (Botany) botany (of anthers) joined to the filament by the base only
5. (Philosophy) (in rationalist philosophy) (of ideas) present in the mind before any experience and knowable by pure reason
[C15: from Latin, from innascī to be born in, from nascī to be born]
inˈnately adv
inˈnateness n

in•nate

(ɪˈneɪt, ˈɪn eɪt)

adj.
1. existing in one from birth; inborn; native: innate talents.
2. inherent in the character of something: an innate defect in the hypothesis.
3. arising from the intellect or the constitution of the mind, rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of good and evil.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin innātus inborn, past participle of innāsci to be born, arise =in- in-2 + nāsci to be born]
in•nate′ly, adv.
in•nate′ness, n.
syn: innate, inborn, congenital, hereditary describe qualities, characteristics, or possessions acquired before or at the time of birth. innate, of Latin origin, and inborn, a native English word, share the literal basic sense “existing at the time of birth,” and they are interchangeable in most contexts: innate (or inborn) stodginess, strength, abilities. congenital refers most often to characteristics acquired during fetal development, esp. defects or undesirable conditions: a congenital deformity; congenital blindness. hereditary describes qualities or things passed on from ancestors, either through the genes or by social or legal means: Hemophilia is a hereditary condition; a hereditary title.

innate

, inherent - The word innate means "inborn" and should apply to living things; inherent is "essential, intrinsic" and applies best to nonliving things like ideas.
See also related terms for inherent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.innate - not established by conditioning or learninginnate - not established by conditioning or learning; "an unconditioned reflex"
2.innate - being talented through inherited qualities; "a natural leader"; "a born musician"; "an innate talent"
intelligent - having the capacity for thought and reason especially to a high degree; "is there intelligent life in the universe?"; "an intelligent question"
3.innate - present at birth but not necessarily hereditary; acquired during fetal development
nonheritable, noninheritable - not inheritable

innate

innate

adjective
1. Possessed at birth:
2. Forming an essential element, as arising from the basic structure of an individual:
Translations
począćwrodzony

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] ADJinnato

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] adj [feeling, sense, ability, talent, understanding] → inné(e)
She has an innate sense of fairness → Elle a un sens inné de l'équité.

innate

adjangeboren; man’s innate desire for happinessdas dem Menschen angeborene Verlangen nach Glück

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] adjinnato/a

in·nate

a. innato-a, inherente.
References in classic literature ?
Calling innate evidence of worth by the name of fancy, is not candid.
Natural, inherent -- as innate ideas, that is to say,
Now, I have come to the conclusion that the basis of all that has happened, has been first of all your innate inexperience (remark the expression 'innate,' prince).
My passions, from that hapless hour, Usurp'd a tyranny which men Have deem'd, since I have reach'd to power; My innate nature - be it so: But, father, there liv'd one who, then, Then - in my boyhood - when their fire Burn'd with a still intenser glow,(For passion must, with youth, expire) E'en then who knew this iron heart In woman's weakness had a part.
That innate love of melody, which she had inherited from her ballad-singing mother, gave the simplest music a power over her which could well-nigh drag her heart out of her bosom at times.
But your mind is warped by an innate principle of general integrity, and therefore not accessible to the cool reasonings of family partiality, or a desire of revenge.
Only the vicissitudes of life can show us its vanity and develop our innate love of death or of rebirth to a new life.
Essay concerning the Human Understanding,' he proved the non- existence of innate ideas.
Pale and sad, her expression and manner both eloquently suggestive of suppressed suffering and sorrow, there was an innate nobility in the carriage of this woman's head, an innate grandeur in the gaze of her large gray eyes and in the lines of her finely proportioned face, which made her irresistibly striking and beautiful, seen under any circumstances and clad in any dress.
Thinks I, Queequeg, under the circumstances, this is a very civilized overture; but, the truth is, these savages have an innate sense of delicacy, say what you will; it is marvellous how essentially polite they are.
He distrusts his own judgment in such matters so much, that he is always unwilling to give his opinion on any picture; but he has an innate propriety and simplicity of taste, which in general direct him perfectly right.
For through his innate stupidity the latter looks upon his revenge as justice pure and simple; while in consequence of his acute consciousness the mouse does not believe in the justice of it.