innate


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Related to innate: Innate ideas, innate immunity, Innate behaviour, Innate intelligence

in·nate

 (ĭ-nāt′, ĭn′āt′)
adj.
1.
a. Existing naturally or by heredity rather than being learned through experience: "Chimpanzees show an innate distrust of contact with strangers" (Cindy Engel).
b. Of or produced by the mind rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of right and wrong.
2. Possessed as an essential characteristic; inherent: "As the Army and farmers built more and more levees, the Missouri lost an innate capacity to absorb its frequent excesses" (William Least Heat-Moon).

[Middle English innat, from Latin innātus, past participle of innāscī, to be born in : in-, in; see in-2 + nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

in·nate′ly adv.
in·nate′ness n.

innate

(ɪˈneɪt; ˈɪneɪt)
adj
1. existing in a person or animal from birth; congenital; inborn
2. being an essential part of the character of a person or thing
3. instinctive; not learned: innate capacities.
4. (Botany) botany (of anthers) joined to the filament by the base only
5. (Philosophy) (in rationalist philosophy) (of ideas) present in the mind before any experience and knowable by pure reason
[C15: from Latin, from innascī to be born in, from nascī to be born]
inˈnately adv
inˈnateness n

in•nate

(ɪˈneɪt, ˈɪn eɪt)

adj.
1. existing in one from birth; inborn; native: innate talents.
2. inherent in the character of something: an innate defect in the hypothesis.
3. arising from the intellect or the constitution of the mind, rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of good and evil.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin innātus inborn, past participle of innāsci to be born, arise =in- in-2 + nāsci to be born]
in•nate′ly, adv.
in•nate′ness, n.
syn: innate, inborn, congenital, hereditary describe qualities, characteristics, or possessions acquired before or at the time of birth. innate, of Latin origin, and inborn, a native English word, share the literal basic sense “existing at the time of birth,” and they are interchangeable in most contexts: innate (or inborn) stodginess, strength, abilities. congenital refers most often to characteristics acquired during fetal development, esp. defects or undesirable conditions: a congenital deformity; congenital blindness. hereditary describes qualities or things passed on from ancestors, either through the genes or by social or legal means: Hemophilia is a hereditary condition; a hereditary title.

innate

, inherent - The word innate means "inborn" and should apply to living things; inherent is "essential, intrinsic" and applies best to nonliving things like ideas.
See also related terms for inherent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.innate - not established by conditioning or learninginnate - not established by conditioning or learning; "an unconditioned reflex"
2.innate - being talented through inherited qualities; "a natural leader"; "a born musician"; "an innate talent"
intelligent - having the capacity for thought and reason especially to a high degree; "is there intelligent life in the universe?"; "an intelligent question"
3.innate - present at birth but not necessarily hereditary; acquired during fetal development
nonheritable, noninheritable - not inheritable

innate

innate

adjective
1. Possessed at birth:
2. Forming an essential element, as arising from the basic structure of an individual:
Translations
począćwrodzony

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] ADJinnato

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] adj [feeling, sense, ability, talent, understanding] → inné(e)
She has an innate sense of fairness → Elle a un sens inné de l'équité.

innate

adjangeboren; man’s innate desire for happinessdas dem Menschen angeborene Verlangen nach Glück

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] adjinnato/a

in·nate

a. innato-a, inherente.
References in classic literature ?
The Delawares who knew by these symptoms that the mind of their friend was not prepared for so mighty an effort of fortitude, relaxed in their attention; and, with an innate delicacy, seemed to bestow all their thoughts on the obsequies of the stranger maiden.
They now went below stairs, where Phoebe--not so much assuming the office as attracting it to herself, by the magnetism of innate fitness--took the most active part in preparing breakfast.
I have not known the man to whose innate kindliness I would more confidently make an appeal.
Thinks I, Queequeg, under the circumstances, this is a very civilized overture; but, the truth is, these savages have an innate sense of delicacy, say what you will; it is marvellous how essentially polite they are.
He distrusts his own judgment in such matters so much, that he is always unwilling to give his opinion on any picture; but he has an innate propriety and simplicity of taste, which in general direct him perfectly right.
Know, that in the course of your future life you will often find yourself elected the involuntary confidant of your acquaintances' secrets: people will instinctively find out, as I have done, that it is not your forte to tell of yourself, but to listen while others talk of themselves; they will feel, too, that you listen with no malevolent scorn of their indiscretion, but with a kind of innate sympathy; not the less comforting and encouraging because it is very unobtrusive in its manifestations.
But no brutality disgusted her: I suppose she has an innate admiration of it, if only her precious person were secure from injury
Looking around him, however, with an air of scorn, ``My Lords,'' said he, ``and especially you, Sir Prior, what think ye of the doctrine the learned tell us, concerning innate attractions and antipathies?
No amount of cruelty appeared sufficient to crush the innate happiness and sweetness from her full little heart.
For through his innate stupidity the latter looks upon his revenge as justice pure and simple; while in consequence of his acute consciousness the mouse does not believe in the justice of it.
They knew full well that this fugitive must be a bandit; but there is an innate sympathy between the Roman brigand and the Roman peasant and the latter is always ready to aid the former.
His parents had always treated him barbarously; she preferred not to see them again, and they made no advances, either from forgetfulness or out of innate hardness.