innkeeper

(redirected from innkeepers)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

inn·keep·er

 (ĭn′kē′pər)
n.
One who owns or manages an inn or hotel.

innkeeper

(ˈɪnˌkiːpə)
n
(Professions) an owner or manager of an inn

inn•keep•er

(ˈɪnˌki pər)

n.
a person who owns or manages an inn or, sometimes, a hotel.
[1540–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.innkeeper - the owner or manager of an inninnkeeper - the owner or manager of an inn  
hostess - a woman innkeeper
padrone - an owner or proprietor of an inn in Italy
patron - the proprietor of an inn
victualer, victualler - an innkeeper (especially British)

innkeeper

noun publican, hotelier, mine host, host or hostess, landlord or landlady He played the part of the innkeeper in the school nativity play.
Translations
صاحِب نُزُل أو فُنْدُق
hospodský
krovært
fogadós
gestgjafi, kráreigandi
hancımeyhaneci

innkeeper

[ˈɪnkiːpəʳ] N [of pub] → tabernero/a m/f (archaic) → posadero/a m/f, mesonero/a m/f

innkeeper

[ˈɪnkiːpər] naubergiste m/f

innkeeper

n(Gast)wirt(in) m(f)

innkeeper

[ˈɪnˌkiːpəʳ] nlocandiere/a

inn

(in) noun
1. a name given to some small hotels or public houses especially in villages or the countryside.
2. in former times, a house providing food and lodging for travellers.
ˈinnkeeper noun
a person who owned or ran such a house.
References in classic literature ?
Now, I travel a great deal, particularly on this road, and I wish to see all innkeepers making a fortune.
It is in the nature of innkeepers and all men who have no pressing business of their own to ask as many questions as possible before giving any information.
March followed him to the bar parlor with some wonder, and his dim sense of repugnance was not dismissed by the first sight of the innkeeper, who was widely different from the genial innkeepers of romance, a bony man, very silent behind a black mustache, but with black, restless eyes.
Morland remonstrated, pleaded the authority of road-books, innkeepers, and milestones; but his friend disregarded them all; he had a surer test of distance.
The mummers (some of the house serfs) dressed up as bears, Turks, innkeepers, and ladies- frightening and funny- bringing in with them the cold from outside and a feeling of gaiety, crowded, at first timidly, into the anteroom, then hiding behind one another they pushed into the ballroom where, shyly at first and then more and more merrily and heartily, they started singing, dancing, and playing Christmas games.
The oldest tavern was enlarged and transformed into an inn, which furnished mules to pilgrims to the Grand Chartreuse who began to come our way, and after two years there was just enough business for two innkeepers.
They were a goodly company, and the Innkeepers all but worshipped them.
Weller's statement relative to the accommodations of the establishment, and to back his entreaties with a variety of dismal conjectures regarding the state of the roads, the doubt of fresh horses being to be had at the next stage, the dead certainty of its raining all night, the equally mortal certainty of its clearing up in the morning, and other topics of inducement familiar to innkeepers.
A Coffin my Innkeeper upon landing in my first whaling port; tombstones staring at me in the whalemen's chapel; and here a gallows
Don Quixote, observing the respectful bearing of the Alcaide of the fortress (for so innkeeper and inn seemed in his eyes), made answer, "Sir Castellan, for me anything will suffice, for
Had it not been for my promise to the innkeeper, she would, I think, have urged me to stay in Leatherhead that night.
The abbe with difficulty got away from the enthusiastic thanks of Caderousse, opened the door himself, got out and mounted his horse, once more saluted the innkeeper, who kept uttering his loud farewells, and then returned by the road he had travelled in coming.