innocently


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in·no·cent

 (ĭn′ə-sənt)
adj.
1. Uncorrupted by evil, malice, or wrongdoing; sinless: an innocent child.
2.
a. Not guilty of a specific crime or offense; legally blameless: was innocent of all charges.
b. Within, allowed by, or sanctioned by the law; lawful.
3.
a. Not dangerous or harmful; innocuous: an innocent prank.
b. Candid; straightforward: a child's innocent stare.
4.
a. Not experienced or worldly; naive.
b. Betraying or suggesting no deception or guile; artless.
5.
a. Not exposed to or familiar with something specified; ignorant: American tourists wholly innocent of French.
b. Unaware: She remained innocent of the complications she had caused.
6. Lacking, deprived, or devoid of something: a novel innocent of literary merit.
n.
1. A person, especially a child, who is free of evil or sin.
2. A simple, guileless, inexperienced, or unsophisticated person.
3. A very young child.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin innocēns, innocent- : in-, not; see in-1 + nocēns, present participle of nocēre, to harm; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

in′no·cent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.innocently - in a not unlawful manner; "he claimed to have purchased the contraband innocently"
2.innocently - in a naively innocent manner; "she smiled at him innocently"
Translations
بِبَراءَه
nevinně
ártatlanul
sakleysislega
nevinne
nedolžno
masumcasafça

innocently

[ˈɪnəsntlɪ] ADV [ask, smile] → inocentemente, con inocencia
she looked at her father innocentlydirigió a su padre una mirada llena de inocencia
the joke had begun innocently enoughla broma había empezado de una forma muy inocente

innocently

[ˈɪnəsəntli] adv
(= trustingly) → en toute innocence
(feigning innocence) [ask, smile] → l'air innocent, innocemment
"Any chance you'd be going there again soon?" I asked innocently → "Il y a une chance pour que tu y retournes bientôt?", demandai-je, l'air innocent., "Il y a une chance pour que tu y retournes bientôt?", demandai-je innocemment.

innocently

advunschuldig; (= in all innocence)in aller Unschuld; the quarrel began innocently enoughder Streit begann ganz harmlos

innocently

[ˈɪnəsntlɪ] advinnocentemente

innocent

(ˈinəsnt) adjective
1. not guilty (of a crime, misdeed etc). A man should be presumed innocent of a crime until he is proved guilty; They hanged an innocent man.
2. (of an action etc) harmless or without harmful or hidden intentions. innocent games and amusements; an innocent remark.
3. free from, or knowing nothing about, evil etc. an innocent child; You can't be so innocent as to believe what advertisements say!
ˈinnocently adverb
ˈinnocence noun
He at last managed to prove his innocence; the innocence of a child.
References in classic literature ?
It's quite true, lads, that this man,' he says, 'is being tortured innocently and for nothing
Louis Shattuck, without one vicious trait, was a real innocently devilish young fellow, who was quite convinced that he was a sophisticated town boy.
Hearing him declare that her interests only had occupied his mind, the poor girl innocently entreated him to forgive her little outbreak of temper.
Moving blindfold in this matter, you have added to the burden of anxiety which she has had to bear, by innocently threatening her secret with discovery through your exertions.
In that instant, innocently as his sister might have taken it, she took his hand.
I have innocently robbed her of her lover, and destroyed her prospects in life.
Twice I saw her looking at me, like one disturbed by anxious thoughts; and twice I heard her say, "Live patiently, live innocently, George, for my sake.
Belated, and not innocently, one bitter winter's midnight, on the road running between two country towns, the blacksmith half-stupidly felt the deadly numbness stealing over him, and sought refuge in a leaning, dilapidated barn.
She has persuaded herself that the answers she innocently gave, in her distress, to Mrs.
The little boy who so innocently played in the garden of his royal father was Prince Richard, the three-yearold son of Henry III of England.
Hardyman has passed the stolen note, you know, as well as I do, that he has passed it innocently.
The reader may remember that Mr Allworthy gave Tom Jones a little horse, as a kind of smart-money for the punishment which he imagined he had suffered innocently.