innovation


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Related to innovation: invention

in·no·va·tion

 (ĭn′ə-vā′shən)
n.
1. The act of introducing something new.
2. Something newly introduced.

in′no·va′tion·al adj.

innovation

(ˌɪnəˈveɪʃən)
n
1. something newly introduced, such as a new method or device
2. the act of innovating
ˌinnoˈvational adj
ˌinnoˈvationist n

in•no•va•tion

(ˌɪn əˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. something new or different introduced.
2. the act of innovating; introduction of new things or methods.
[1540–50; < Late Latin]
in`no•va′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.innovation - a creation (a new device or process) resulting from study and experimentationinnovation - a creation (a new device or process) resulting from study and experimentation
creation - an artifact that has been brought into existence by someone
2.innovation - the creation of something in the mindinnovation - the creation of something in the mind
creative thinking, creativeness, creativity - the ability to create
concoction - the invention of a scheme or story to suit some purpose; "his testimony was a concoction"; "she has no peer in the concoction of mystery stories"
contrivance - the faculty of contriving; inventive skill; "his skillful contrivance of answers to every problem"
3.innovation - the act of starting something for the first timeinnovation - the act of starting something for the first time; introducing something new; "she looked forward to her initiation as an adult"; "the foundation of a new scientific society"
commencement, start, beginning - the act of starting something; "he was responsible for the beginning of negotiations"
authorship, paternity - the act of initiating a new idea or theory or writing; "the authorship of the theory is disputed"

innovation

noun
1. change, revolution, departure, introduction, variation, transformation, upheaval, alteration technological innovations of the industrial age
2. newness, novelty, originality, freshness, modernism, modernization, uniqueness We must promote originality and encourage innovation.

innovation

noun
A new and unusual thing:
Translations
إِبْتِكَارٌإبْتِكار، تَجْديد
inovacezměna
fornyelseopfindelse
innovaatio
inovacija
újítás
nÿjung, nÿbreytni
革新
혁신
naujovėnovatorius
jaunievedumsjauninājums
innovation
นวัตกรรม
sự đổi mới

innovation

[ˌɪnəʊˈveɪʃən] N (= act) → innovación f; (= thing) → innovación f, novedad f

innovation

[ˌɪnəˈveɪʃən] n
(= new method, invention) → innovation f
the technological innovations of the industrial age → les innovations technologiques de l'âge industriel
(= inventiveness) → innovation f
We must encourage innovation → Nous devons encourager l'innovation.

innovation

nInnovation f; (= introduction also)Neueinführung f (→ of +gen); (= thing introduced also)Neuerung f

innovation

[ˌɪnəʊˈveɪʃn] ninnovazione f

innovation

(inəˈveiʃən) noun
(the act of making) a change or a new arrangement etc. The new system in the school canteen was a welcome innovation.
ˈinnovator noun

innovation

إِبْتِكَارٌ inovace opfindelse Innovation καινοτομία innovación innovaatio innovation inovacija innovazione 革新 혁신 innovatie oppfinnelse innowacja inovação нововведение innovation นวัตกรรม yenilik sự đổi mới 创新
References in classic literature ?
On the door hung a heavy brass knocker, an innovation introduced into the village by Helen White's mother, who had also organized a women's club for the study of po- etry.
Such an innovation on the silence and retirement of the forest could not fail to enlist the ears of those who journeyed at so short a distance in advance.
Buxom lasses, almost as antiquated as their mothers, excepting where a straw hat, a fine ribbon, or perhaps a white frock, gave symptoms of city innovation.
Fourtou should ever have agreed to so strange an innovation.
For the opposite reason, Prince John hated and contemned the few Saxon families of consequence which subsisted in England, and omitted no opportunity of mortifying and affronting them; being conscious that his person and pretensions were disliked by them, as well as by the greater part of the English commons, who feared farther innovation upon their rights and liberties, from a sovereign of John's licentious and tyrannical disposition.
The telephone business was still so young, it was so little appreciated even by the telephone officials and engineers, that the public regarded a second or a third telephone system in one city as quite a possible and desirable innovation.
A month or two found even the Dodecagons infected with the innovation.
Had he his birth-right, thought Julia, it would be there in reality; and this idea amply justified the innovation.
Grant so happily blended the universally received opinions of the Christian faith with the dogmas of his own church that, although none were entirely exempt from the influence of his reasons, very few took any alarm at the innovation.
The innovation, if not wrong as an innovation, will be wrong as an expense.
The causes and motives of seditions are, innovation in religion; taxes; alteration of laws and customs; breaking of privileges; general oppression; advancement of unworthy persons; strangers; dearths; disbanded soldiers; factions grown desperate; and what soever, in offending people, joineth and knitteth them in a common cause.
Perkins' most unpopular innovation was his system of taking occasionally another man's form.

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