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Inn

 (ĭn)
A river of eastern Switzerland, western Austria, and southeast Germany flowing about 515 km (320 mi) northeastward to the Danube River. Its lower course forms part of the German-Austrian border.

inn

 (ĭn)
n.
1. A public lodging house serving food and drink to travelers; a hotel.
2. A tavern or restaurant.
3. Chiefly British Formerly, a residence hall for students, especially law students, in London.

[Middle English, from Old English; see en in Indo-European roots.]

Inn

(ɪn)
n
(Placename) a river in central Europe, rising in Switzerland in Graubünden and flowing northeast through Austria and Bavaria to join the River Danube at Passau: forms part of the border between Austria and Germany. Length: 514 km (319 miles)

Inn

(ɪn)
n
(Placename) a river in central Europe, rising in Switzerland in Graubünden and flowing northeast through Austria and Bavaria to join the River Danube at Passau: forms part of the border between Austria and Germany. Length: 514 km (319 miles)

inn

(ɪn)

n.
1. a commercial establishment that provides lodging and food for the public, esp. travelers; small hotel.
2. a tavern.
3. (cap.) any of several buildings in London formerly used as places of residence for students, esp. law students. Compare Inns of Court.
[before 1000; Middle English, Old English in(n) house; akin to Old Norse inni (adv.) within, in the house]

Inn

(ɪn)

n.
a river in central Europe, flowing from S Switzerland through Austria and Germany into the Danube. 320 mi. (515 km) long.

inn

  • caravanserai - A type of inn in Eastern countries where caravans are put up.
  • harbergery - An inn or place of entertainment.
  • inn - Etymologically a place "in" which people live or stay, from Proto-Germanic innam.
  • ostler - A stableman at an inn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inn - a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelersinn - a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
caravan inn, caravansary, caravanserai, khan - an inn in some eastern countries with a large courtyard that provides accommodation for caravans
hotel - a building where travelers can pay for lodging and meals and other services
imaret - a hostel for pilgrims in Turkey
post house, posthouse - an inn for exchanging post horses and accommodating riders
roadhouse - an inn (usually outside city limits on a main road) providing meals and liquor and dancing and (sometimes) gambling

inn

noun tavern, bar, watering hole (facetious slang), boozer (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. informal), local (Brit. informal), roadhouse, hostelry (archaic or facetious), alehouse (archaic), taproom the Waterside inn
Translations
خَانٌخَمّارَه، خانفُنْدُق ريفي
hospodahostineczájezdní hostinec
krogæstgiveri
majatalovärdshus
prenoćište
vendéglõ
gistihús, krágistihús; veitingahús, krá
宿屋居酒屋旅館いざかやしゅくや
여인숙
smuklėsmuklininkasužeigos namai
iebraucamā vietaviesnīca
gostilna
gästgiverikrogvärdshus
โรงแรมเล็กๆ
hanküçük otelmeyhane
quán trọ

inn

[ɪn]
A. N (= pub) → taberna f; (= hotel) → hostería f (archaic) (= tavern) → posada f, mesón m
B. CPD inn sign Nletrero m de mesón
the Inns of Court NPL (Brit) (Jur) → el Colegio de Abogados (en Londres)

inn

[ˈɪn] nauberge f

inn

n
Gasthaus nt; (old) (= hotel)Herberge f (old); (= tavern)Schenke f, → Schänke f
(Jur) the Inns of Courtdie vier englischen Juristenverbände

inn

[ɪn] nlocanda

inn

(in) noun
1. a name given to some small hotels or public houses especially in villages or the countryside.
2. in former times, a house providing food and lodging for travellers.
ˈinnkeeper noun
a person who owned or ran such a house.

inn

خَانٌ hostinec kro Gasthaus πανδοχείο posada majatalo auberge prenoćište locanda 宿屋 여인숙 herberg vertshus zajazd hospedaria гостиница värdshus โรงแรมเล็กๆ han quán trọ 客栈
References in classic literature ?
I now by instinct followed the streets that took me waterward, for there, doubtless, were the cheapest, if not the cheeriest inns.
If he could pass muster anywhere during his early novitiate it would be in small inns and on the road; so to these places we confined ourselves.
Such rooms and beds and embroidered linen are as frequent in German village inns as they are rare in ours.
Was not this intimacy with the prisoner, in reality a very slight one, forced upon the prisoner in coaches, inns, and packets?
The languid stillness of the place was only broken by the chirping of this fire and by the voice of one of the Doctors, who was wandering slowly through a perfect library of evidence, and stopping to put up, from time to time, at little roadside inns of argument on the journey.
Meanwhile I am approaching a decorative old Surrey town, little more than a cluster of ripe old inns, to one of which I have much pleasure in inviting the reader to dinner.
The man who came with the barrow told us the mail had set him down the morning before at the Royal George, that he had inquired what inns there were along the coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I suppose, and described as lonely, had chosen it from the others for his place of residence.
As soon as he enters a house (for they have no inns in this nation), the master informs his neighbours that he hath a guest; immediately they bring in bread and all kinds of provisions; and there is great care taken to provide enough, because, if the guest complains, the town is obliged to pay double the value of what they ought to have furnished.
He was never seen on 'Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the "City"; no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln's Inn, or Gray's Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen's Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts.
And then he--a wanderer on the earth, a man without fortune, a man without family, a soldier accustomed to inns, cabarets, taverns, and restaurants, a lover of wine forced to depend upon chance treats--was about to partake of family meals, to enjoy the pleasures of a comfortable establishment, and to give himself up to those little attentions which "the harder one is, the more they please," as old soldiers say.
came on into Hertfordshire, anxiously renewing them at all the turnpikes, and at the inns in Barnet and Hatfield, but without any success-- no such people had been seen to pass through.
circuits = American "circuit judges" travelled from town to town, holding court in each and sleeping at local inns and taverns}