innuendo


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in·nu·en·do

 (ĭn′yo͞o-ĕn′dō)
n. pl. in·nu·en·does
1. An indirect or subtle, usually derogatory implication in expression; an insinuation.
2. Law A plaintiff's allegation explicating the defamatory meaning of the publication or utterance in a libel suit.

[From Latin innuendō, by hinting, ablative of innuendum, gerund of innuere, to nod to : in-, to, toward; see in-2 + -nuere, to nod.]

innuendo

(ˌɪnjʊˈɛndəʊ)
n, pl -dos or -does
1. an indirect or subtle reference, esp one made maliciously or indicating criticism or disapproval; insinuation
2. (Law) law (in pleading) a word introducing an explanatory phrase, usually in parenthesis
3. (Law) law (in an action for defamation)
a. an explanation of the construction put upon words alleged to be defamatory where the defamatory meaning is not apparent
b. the words thus explained
[C17: from Latin, literally: by hinting, from innuendum, gerund of innuere to convey by a nod, from in-2 + nuere to nod]

in•nu•en•do

(ˌɪn yuˈɛn doʊ)

n., pl. -dos, -does.
1. an indirect intimation about a person or thing, esp. of a disparaging nature.
2. Law. a parenthetic explanation or specification in a pleading.
[1555–65; < Latin: by nodding, abl. of innuendum, ger. of innuere to signal with a nod]

innuendo

- Latin for "by nodding at, pointing to," or "intimating," from in-, "toward," and nuere, "nod."
See also related terms for pointed.

innuendo

Subtle or indirect implication, usually of something discreditable.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.innuendo - an indirect (and usually malicious) implication
implication - an accusation that brings into intimate and usually incriminating connection

innuendo

noun insinuation, suggestion, hint, implication, whisper, overtone, intimation, imputation, aspersion The report was based on rumours and innuendo.

innuendo

noun
An artful, indirect, often derogatory hint:
Translations
AnspielungInnuendo
vihjaus

innuendo

[ˌɪnjʊˈendəʊ] N (innuendo(e)s (pl)) → indirecta f, insinuación f
his comments were full of sexual innuendosus comentarios estaban llenos de alusiones or connotaciones sexuales

innuendo

[ˌɪnjuˈɛndəʊ] [innuendoes] (pl) nsous-entendu m
sexual innuendo → allusions fpl à caractère sexuel

innuendo

n pl <-es> → versteckte Andeutung; sexual innuendosexuelle Anspielung

innuendo

[ˌɪnjʊˈɛndəʊ] n (insinuation) → insinuazione f; (sexual) → allusione f
References in classic literature ?
With his characteristic quickwittedness he caught the drift of each innuendo, divined whence it came, at whom and on what ground it was aimed, and that afforded him, as it always did, a certain satisfaction.
Thers was no mistaking his innuendo, and Saxon felt her cheeks flaming.
There were volumes of innuendo in the way the "eventually" was spaced, and each syllable given its due stress.
Lydgate," said Rosamond, not without a touch of innuendo.
With this cutting innuendo, Tom jumped down from his bough, and threw a stone with a "hoigh
What is the universal sense of want and ignorance, but the fine innuendo by which the soul makes its enormous claim?
This, like "The Wanderer", is one of the many introspective passages in the work, and is full of innuendos and hints as to the Nietzschean outlook on life.
He said: "The manner of the smears and innuendo, questioning whether I even belong in the Labour Party, I find unacceptable.
But we get the feeling that the uproar over the innuendo, despite how misguided that innuendo was, gave more attention to the matter than the innuendo itself.
Paul O'Grady did enough to suggest he was a great choice - and will be even better once he's worked out how far he can push the innuendo and the mickey taking.
The word innuendo sounds like it could be a musical term, like crescendo or diminuendo.